Kenai

Kenai man hit, killed by car on Spur

A Kenai man has died after being hit by a car on the Kenai Spur Highway on Tuesday night. Monte Necessary, 36, was allegedly crossing… Continue reading

Women arrested for spending thousands with stolen credit cards

Eight women have been charged for allegedly using a handful of stolen credit cards to purchase more than $8,000 worth of goods during a series… Continue reading

Eight attorneys apply for Kenai Superior Court

Sitting judges, a public defender, assistant district attorneys and a private practice lawyer are among the eight applicants vying to become the next Kenai Superior… Continue reading

Dipnetter Brad Gamblin (left) digs in the sand of Kenai’s north beach with his grandchildren Stella (in blue) and Marly Wilson on Thursday, July 26, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The three, plus grandmother Cher Gamblin, brought the grandchildren on their first dipnetting trip this year. The morning, Brad Gamblin said, “was very productive.” Getting up early, he said the family had caught a dozen salmon by 9 a.m. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)

Kenai’s exclusivity offering fails to bring vendors to the dipnet

This year’s personal-use dipnet fishery hasn’t draw many vendors to the north and south beaches along the mouth of the Kenai River. Nor did the… Continue reading

Dipnetter Brad Gamblin (left) digs in the sand of Kenai’s north beach with his grandchildren Stella (in blue) and Marly Wilson on Thursday, July 26, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The three, plus grandmother Cher Gamblin, brought the grandchildren on their first dipnetting trip this year. The morning, Brad Gamblin said, “was very productive.” Getting up early, he said the family had caught a dozen salmon by 9 a.m. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
Melody Miller (left) disentangles a salmon she just netted on Kenai’s north beach with the help of her daughter Manuia Tufi on Thursday, July 26, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The two had recently after arrived from Anchorage and had caught the day’s first fish. Miller said this is her seventh year of dipnetting in Kenai. On Thursday afternoon, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced the fishery will close two days early, at 12:01 a.m on Monday. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)

Dipnetting to close early, sockeye bag limit reduced

Personal-use dipnetting on the Kenai River will end two days early this year, and sportfishermen will be limited to a one fish per day for… Continue reading

Melody Miller (left) disentangles a salmon she just netted on Kenai’s north beach with the help of her daughter Manuia Tufi on Thursday, July 26, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The two had recently after arrived from Anchorage and had caught the day’s first fish. Miller said this is her seventh year of dipnetting in Kenai. On Thursday afternoon, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced the fishery will close two days early, at 12:01 a.m on Monday. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai Parks and Recreation employee Jacob Hart rakes Kenai’s south beach to demonstrate how the magnetic bar hanging behind his rake picks up nails and other metal debris buried under the sand, on Friday, July 20, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The idea of using a magnetic rake to sweep up metal objects — left after many years of pallet bonfires, lost tent stakes, and general litter — came from Kenai Central High School sophmore Riley Graves, who created a magnetic leaf-rake prototype for this April’s Caring for the Kenai competition. Kenai Public Works Department shop foreman Randy Parrish built the rake after Graves’ idea, which he presented to the Kenai City Council on May 16. Since the July 10 beginning of this summer’s personal use dipnet fishery, Hart said the rake’s been deployed every evening. “When you drive over a dark spot in the sand, where you can tell it’s been a fire pit, you can hear the nails going tink, tink, tink,” he said. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)

Metal harvest: High schooler’s project make a dent in beach litter

A local teenager’s invention has been put into action cleaning Kenai’s beach. Since this summer’s personal use dipnet fishery season launched July 10, Kenai Parks… Continue reading

Kenai Parks and Recreation employee Jacob Hart rakes Kenai’s south beach to demonstrate how the magnetic bar hanging behind his rake picks up nails and other metal debris buried under the sand, on Friday, July 20, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. The idea of using a magnetic rake to sweep up metal objects — left after many years of pallet bonfires, lost tent stakes, and general litter — came from Kenai Central High School sophmore Riley Graves, who created a magnetic leaf-rake prototype for this April’s Caring for the Kenai competition. Kenai Public Works Department shop foreman Randy Parrish built the rake after Graves’ idea, which he presented to the Kenai City Council on May 16. Since the July 10 beginning of this summer’s personal use dipnet fishery, Hart said the rake’s been deployed every evening. “When you drive over a dark spot in the sand, where you can tell it’s been a fire pit, you can hear the nails going tink, tink, tink,” he said. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
Pilot Alex Agosti inspects Kenai Aviation’s Cessna 206 before a flight with Kenai Aviation owner Joel Caldwell on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at the Kenai Municipal Airport in Kenai, Alaska. The family-owned aviation business flew passengers and cargo around the Cook Inlet region for 56 years before closing in September 2017 after the Cook Inlet oil field operators who were its primary customers consolidated and dropped investment in response to low oil prices. Caldwell bought the business early this year from Jim Bielefeld, son of founder Bob Bielefeld. Calwell plans to revive and expand Kenai Aviation into a statewide charter. Presently he and two other pilots — Agosti and Keith Ham — are offering flightseeing trips. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)

With new owner, Kenai Aviation looking beyond Cook Inlet

When Kenai Aviation closed in late 2017, it left behind more than half a century of history at the Kenai Municipal Airport and a generation… Continue reading

Pilot Alex Agosti inspects Kenai Aviation’s Cessna 206 before a flight with Kenai Aviation owner Joel Caldwell on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at the Kenai Municipal Airport in Kenai, Alaska. The family-owned aviation business flew passengers and cargo around the Cook Inlet region for 56 years before closing in September 2017 after the Cook Inlet oil field operators who were its primary customers consolidated and dropped investment in response to low oil prices. Caldwell bought the business early this year from Jim Bielefeld, son of founder Bob Bielefeld. Calwell plans to revive and expand Kenai Aviation into a statewide charter. Presently he and two other pilots — Agosti and Keith Ham — are offering flightseeing trips. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
Seagulls flock to where participants in the personal use dipnet fishery fish on the north beach of the Kenai River on July 10, 2016 in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

High bacteria levels detected at Kenai beaches

Both of the Kenai beaches have too much fecal coliform and enterococci bacteria in the water to meet state standards. Every year, the Alaska Department… Continue reading

Seagulls flock to where participants in the personal use dipnet fishery fish on the north beach of the Kenai River on July 10, 2016 in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)
In this Aug. 10, 2008 file photo, hikers watch a brown bear fish on the Russian River near the falls near Cooper Landing, Alaska. Human-bear interactions are a fact of life in Alaska. (Clarion file photo)

People and bears intersect on the Kenai—not always badly

People and bears share space in Alaska — it’s a fact of life. Sometimes, that includes driveways and front lawns. Visitors to Kenai Peninsula parks… Continue reading

In this Aug. 10, 2008 file photo, hikers watch a brown bear fish on the Russian River near the falls near Cooper Landing, Alaska. Human-bear interactions are a fact of life in Alaska. (Clarion file photo)

People and bears intersect on the Kenai—not always badly

People and bears share space in Alaska — it’s a fact of life. Sometimes, that includes driveways and front lawns. Visitors to Kenai Peninsula parks… Continue reading

Seagulls flock to where participants in the personal use dipnet fishery fish on the north beach of the Kenai River on July 10, 2016 in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Dipnet season begins Tuesday. Here’s some things to know.

Tuesday marks the beginning of the busiest part of the visitor season in Kenai — the personal-use dipnet season. The Kenai River personal-use dipnet fishery… Continue reading

Seagulls flock to where participants in the personal use dipnet fishery fish on the north beach of the Kenai River on July 10, 2016 in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Dipnet season begins Tuesday. Here’s some things to know.

Tuesday marks the beginning of the busiest part of the visitor season in Kenai — the personal-use dipnet season. The Kenai River personal-use dipnet fishery… Continue reading

Kenai’s dock will go without an operator this year after CISPRI backs out

Kenai’s city dock will be without an operator this summer after Cook Inlet Spill Response and Prevention, Inc. (CISPRI) backed out of a deal with… Continue reading

This Monday, Oct. 24, 2016 photo shows the Kenai City Dock in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Kenai’s dock will go without an operator this year after CISPRI backs out

Kenai’s city dock will be without an operator this summer after Cook Inlet Spill Response and Prevention, Inc. (CISPRI) backed out of a deal with… Continue reading

This Monday, Oct. 24, 2016 photo shows the Kenai City Dock in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)
Kenai’s American Legion Post 20 drives their truck remodeled as a steam locomotive during Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. Aboard are members of the Legion-sponsored Twins baseball team. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion) 
                                 Snare drummers from Kenai Central High School’s drumline perform in the Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
                                 Wildland firefighters from the Alaska Division of Forestry march in Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai’s American Legion Post 20 drives their truck remodeled as a steam locomotive during Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. Aboard are members of the Legion-sponsored Twins baseball team. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion) 
                                 Snare drummers from Kenai Central High School’s drumline perform in the Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)
                                 Wildland firefighters from the Alaska Division of Forestry march in Kenai’s Fourth of July parade on Wednesday, July 4 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ben Boettger/Peninsula Clarion)

Excavation project near Kenai River shot down

Editor's note: This story has been changed to correct Jason Foster's relationship to North Star Paving. On Wednesday Kenai’s seven Planning and Zoning Commissioners unanimously… Continue reading

Excavation project near Kenai River shot down

On Wednesday Kenai’s seven Planning and Zoning Commissioners unanimously denied a permit for a project along the Kenai River that the applicant — Dr. Lavern… Continue reading

100 years ago, Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages

At the dawn of the 20th century, 15 people lived in the village of Point Possession on the northern tip of the Kenai Peninsula, according… Continue reading

Dr. Alan Boraas, professor of anthropology at Kenai Peninsula College, leads a tour of Kalifornsky Villagein May 2015. The Native settlement was abandoned in the 1920s but is still home to a rich cultural history. (Photo courtesy of Jenny Neyman/Redoubt Reporter)

100 years ago, Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages

At the dawn of the 20th century, 15 people lived in the village of Point Possession on the northern tip of the Kenai Peninsula, according… Continue reading

Dr. Alan Boraas, professor of anthropology at Kenai Peninsula College, leads a tour of Kalifornsky Villagein May 2015. The Native settlement was abandoned in the 1920s but is still home to a rich cultural history. (Photo courtesy of Jenny Neyman/Redoubt Reporter)
[flipp]