COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)

COVID-19: Hospitalizations jump, 4th consecutive week of rising cases

4 patients are on ventilators and two are located in the Gulf Coast region

 

Gov. Mike Dunleavy gives his State of the State address at the Alaska State Capitol on Monday, Jan. 23, 2023, in Junuea, Alaska. (Clarise Larson/Juneau Empire)

A chance ‘to change the course of Alaska’s history’

Dunleavy to deliver first State of State of 2nd term

 

In this June 15, 2014, file photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, a polar bear dries off after taking a swim in the Chukchi Sea in Alaska. A polar bear has attacked and killed two people in a remote village in western Alaska, according to state troopers who said they received the report of the attack on Tuesday, Jan 17, 2023, in Wales, on the western tip of the Seward Peninsula. (Brian Battaile/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)

Rare attack in Alaska renews interest in polar bear patrols

A polar bear attack killed a mother and her 1-year-old son in Wales, a tiny, remote Alaska whaling village

  • Jan 20, 2023
  • By Gene Johnson and Mark Thiessen Associated Press
  • NewsState News

 

Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire
Arsenio “Pastor” Credo and other Alaska Native veterans listen to a presentation Thursday afternoon on how to apply for up to 160 acres of the more than 27 million acres of public land available to Alaska Native veterans who were unable to apply for their acres of in-state land due to serving during the Vietnam War.
Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire
Arsenio “Pastor” Credo and other Alaska Native veterans listen to a presentation Thursday afternoon on how to apply for up to 160 acres of the more than 27 million acres of public land available to Alaska Native veterans who were unable to apply for their acres of in-state land due to serving during the Vietnam War.
Graph showing monthly changes in employment from 2019 to 2022, by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development using data from their Research and Analysis Section. (Screenshot)

Jobs up in 2022, fall short of predictions

The department predicted that 9,800 jobs would be added in 2022, overshooting the real numbers by 53%

Graph showing monthly changes in employment from 2019 to 2022, by the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development using data from their Research and Analysis Section. (Screenshot)
A map of updated marine zone boundaries, set to be put into effect on March 8, 2023. (Screenshot)
A map of updated marine zone boundaries, set to be put into effect on March 8, 2023. (Screenshot)
Nurse Tracy Silta draws a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the walk-in clinic at the intersection of the Kenai Spur and Sterling Highways in Soldotna, Alaska, on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)

State health officials: COVID vaccine is safe

Alaska state health officials hosted a Public Health ECHO on Wednesday

Nurse Tracy Silta draws a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the walk-in clinic at the intersection of the Kenai Spur and Sterling Highways in Soldotna, Alaska, on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
Tuberculosis bacteria (File)

State tuberculosis case counts reach 10-year high

Active tuberculosis cases in Alaska have spiked 66%

Tuberculosis bacteria (File)
Chelsea Berg, a nurse at Peninsula Community Health Services, administers a flu shot during a free drive-thru flu shot event at Kenai Central High School on Oct. 24, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion file)

Influenza and RSV declining in Alaska; COVID trends upward

That increase is seemingly driven by the appearance and increasing prevalence of a new subvariant of omicron

Chelsea Berg, a nurse at Peninsula Community Health Services, administers a flu shot during a free drive-thru flu shot event at Kenai Central High School on Oct. 24, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion file)
The State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin that includes “Syphilis Update — Alaska, 2021.” (Screenshot)

State syphilis epidemic continues; officials urge testing

The number of cases reported in 2021 were 447, a 26.6% increase over the 353 reported in 2020

The State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin that includes “Syphilis Update — Alaska, 2021.” (Screenshot)
COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)

COVID-19: 2nd week of statewide case increase; hospitalizations drop

In the Gulf Coast region one patient was reported hospitalized with COVID-19

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
A person walks up the steps of the Alaska Capitol on Monday, Jan. 16, 2023, in Juneau, Alaska. The new legislative session begins on Tuesday, Jan. 17. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)

Alaska Legislature to face familiar challenges this year

The Alaska Legislature convenes for a new session Tuesday

A person walks up the steps of the Alaska Capitol on Monday, Jan. 16, 2023, in Juneau, Alaska. The new legislative session begins on Tuesday, Jan. 17. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
Lawmakers, staff and other workers inside the Alaska State Capitol are preparing this week for the upcoming session of the Alaska State Legislature that starts Jan. 17, 2023. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

Alaska court: Anchorage Democrat qualified for House seat

A brief order from the state Supreme Court affirmed the superior court’s conclusion

Lawmakers, staff and other workers inside the Alaska State Capitol are preparing this week for the upcoming session of the Alaska State Legislature that starts Jan. 17, 2023. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
A home that was knocked off its foundation floats down Snake River during a severe storm in Nome, Alaska, is caught under a bridge on, Sept. 17, 2022. After the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage along Alaska’s western coast last fall, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents, largely Alaska Natives, recovery financially. (AP Photo/Peggy Fagerstrom, File)

FEMA fires group for nonsensical Alaska Native translations

Residents expecting to find instructions on how to file for aid in Alaska Native languages instead were reading bizarre phrases

A home that was knocked off its foundation floats down Snake River during a severe storm in Nome, Alaska, is caught under a bridge on, Sept. 17, 2022. After the remnants of a rare typhoon caused extensive damage along Alaska’s western coast last fall, the U.S. government stepped in to help residents, largely Alaska Natives, recovery financially. (AP Photo/Peggy Fagerstrom, File)
Jesse Bjorkman, left, and Justin Ruffridge take part in forums organized by the Peninsula Clarion and KDLL ahead of the November 2022 election. Bjorkman and Ruffridge won seats in the Alaska State Senate and Alaska State House of Representatives, respectively, and are slated to begin work in Juneau on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2023. (Composite photo)

Bjorkman, Ruffridge prepare for 1st legislative session

They will officially get to work on Jan. 17 — the first day of the 33rd Alaska Legislature’s first regular session

Jesse Bjorkman, left, and Justin Ruffridge take part in forums organized by the Peninsula Clarion and KDLL ahead of the November 2022 election. Bjorkman and Ruffridge won seats in the Alaska State Senate and Alaska State House of Representatives, respectively, and are slated to begin work in Juneau on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2023. (Composite photo)
Exxon Mobil Billings Refinery sits in Billings, Mont. Exxon Mobil’s scientists were remarkably accurate in their predictions about global warming, even as the company made public statements that contradicted its own scientists’ conclusions, a new study says. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Study: Exxon Mobil accurately predicted warming since 1970s

The Exxon-funded science was “actually astonishing” in its precision and accuracy, the study found

  • Jan 12, 2023
  • By Seth Borenstein and Cathy Bussewitz Associated Press
  • NewsState News
Exxon Mobil Billings Refinery sits in Billings, Mont. Exxon Mobil’s scientists were remarkably accurate in their predictions about global warming, even as the company made public statements that contradicted its own scientists’ conclusions, a new study says. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks to reporters during a news conference at the state Capitol, April 28, 2022, in Juneau, Alaska. Dunleavy outlined proposed legislation Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023, for Alaska to capitalize on carbon markets, seeking to diversify state revenues long heavily reliant on proceeds from oil. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)

Dunleavy pitches plan to capitalize on carbon markets

The Republican governor and members of his administration outlined the proposal at a news conference in Anchorage.

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks to reporters during a news conference at the state Capitol, April 28, 2022, in Juneau, Alaska. Dunleavy outlined proposed legislation Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023, for Alaska to capitalize on carbon markets, seeking to diversify state revenues long heavily reliant on proceeds from oil. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, File)
COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)

COVID-19: Statewide cases and hospitalizations up

That makes the largest increase reported since Sept. 14

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
Anthime “Baked Alaska” Gionet, who livestreamed himself storming the U.S. Capitol in Jan. 6, arrives at federal court in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Capitol riot far-right internet personality gets 60 days

Gionet incriminated himself and other rioters with the video that he streamed to a live audience of roughly 16,000 followers

Anthime “Baked Alaska” Gionet, who livestreamed himself storming the U.S. Capitol in Jan. 6, arrives at federal court in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Shawnda O’Brien, the just-departed state Director of the Division of Public Assistance, talks Dec. 27 about the problems that are resulting in months-long backlogs in processing applications for benefits commonly referred to as food stamps. Her departure as director was announced Monday following weeks of widespread media coverage about the backlog that is expected to take additional months to resolve. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Head of state’s troubled food stamps program replaced

Director of the Division of Public Assistance departs in wake of months-long backlog.

Shawnda O’Brien, the just-departed state Director of the Division of Public Assistance, talks Dec. 27 about the problems that are resulting in months-long backlogs in processing applications for benefits commonly referred to as food stamps. Her departure as director was announced Monday following weeks of widespread media coverage about the backlog that is expected to take additional months to resolve. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)