Arts

Kate Cox, 12, testifies before the Kenai City Council on Wednesday, June 16, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)

Council, public voice support for Triumvirate land donation

The land is located near Daubenspeck Park by the Kenai Walmart.

 

Homer artist Jenna Gerrety straightens paintings currently being shown at Sustainable Wares. (Photo by McKibben Jackinsky)

Regeneration of art and man: Gerrety finds inspiration in nature

Put nature and man together and what do you get? For starters, a sky brilliantly colored by the sun with oranges and reds, mountains deep… Continue reading

 

Photos by Michael Armstrong / Homer News
Mary Beth Leigh, director of the Microbial Worlds project, stands next to the exhibit on June 4 at the Pratt Museum & Park in Homer. The exhibit shows through the summer of 2021. Left, “Emergence,” by Nancy Hausle-Johnson.

‘Microbial World’ blends science, art

Exhibit postponed by the pandemic opens at Pratt Museum & Park in Homer.

 

On Saturday, May 15, 2021, Lulu Hawkins, age 6 holds up her pottery tour purchase: a David Kaufmann mug at his studio in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by David Kaufman)

Homer pottery tour returns

After a year hiatus, Homer’s annual Pottery Studio Tour returned to bring fun, beauty and education to ceramic enthusiasts May 15-16. With five studios participating… Continue reading

On Saturday, May 15, 2021, Lulu Hawkins, age 6 holds up her pottery tour purchase: a David Kaufmann mug at his studio in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by David Kaufman)
From left: Jayni Parish, Alyeska Krull, Selia Butler, Brittany Gilman and Braeden Garrett (center) act onstage as their characters the March sisters and Theodore “Laurie” Lawrence in the Kenai Performers’ production of “Little Women,” which headlines on Thursday, May 20, 2021. (Photo provided)

‘Finding their path in the world’

“Little Women” musical debuts this weekend

From left: Jayni Parish, Alyeska Krull, Selia Butler, Brittany Gilman and Braeden Garrett (center) act onstage as their characters the March sisters and Theodore “Laurie” Lawrence in the Kenai Performers’ production of “Little Women,” which headlines on Thursday, May 20, 2021. (Photo provided)
This screenshot from the Kachemak Bay Writers' Conference website shows the faculty who will be attending the conference, held virtually May 15-18. From left to right, top row, are Francisco Cantu, Victoria Chang, Ernestine Hayes, and Brandon Hobson. From left to right, bottom row, are Anis Mojgani, Marie Mutsuki Mockett and Vera Starbard.

Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference includes readings for the public

After hiatus, annual event back as program transitions out of pandemic

This screenshot from the Kachemak Bay Writers' Conference website shows the faculty who will be attending the conference, held virtually May 15-18. From left to right, top row, are Francisco Cantu, Victoria Chang, Ernestine Hayes, and Brandon Hobson. From left to right, bottom row, are Anis Mojgani, Marie Mutsuki Mockett and Vera Starbard.
Alex Rydlinski holds one of his pieces in an Instagram photo from July 18, 2020. (Alex Rydlinski)
Alex Rydlinski holds one of his pieces in an Instagram photo from July 18, 2020. (Alex Rydlinski)

Art Guild welcomes self-taught artist as new executive director

Originally from Fairbanks, Rydlinski was looking for a place “off the grid”

Alex Rydlinski holds one of his pieces in an Instagram photo from July 18, 2020. (Alex Rydlinski)
Alex Rydlinski holds one of his pieces in an Instagram photo from July 18, 2020. (Alex Rydlinski)
Foreground, from left to right: Kenai Middle School seventh grader Cooper Tallent-Darling and eighth grader Gavin Hunt perform as their “Lion King” characters, Simba and Mufasa, while the rest of the cast acts in the background. The school drama department recorded and filmed a rendition of the Disney movie and premiered it in May 2021. (Photo provided by Kenai Middle School drama)
Foreground, from left to right: Kenai Middle School seventh grader Cooper Tallent-Darling and eighth grader Gavin Hunt perform as their “Lion King” characters, Simba and Mufasa, while the rest of the cast acts in the background. The school drama department recorded and filmed a rendition of the Disney movie and premiered it in May 2021. (Photo provided by Kenai Middle School drama)
Camry Ellis (left) and Braeden Porter sing onstage as their characters Gabriella Montez and Troy Bolton in the Nikiski Middle/High School’s spring production of “High School Musical” in Nikiski, Alaska, on Wednesday May 5, 2021. (Camille Botello / Peninsula Clarion)

‘We’re all in this together’

Nikiski students bring high school theater back with “High School Musical”

Camry Ellis (left) and Braeden Porter sing onstage as their characters Gabriella Montez and Troy Bolton in the Nikiski Middle/High School’s spring production of “High School Musical” in Nikiski, Alaska, on Wednesday May 5, 2021. (Camille Botello / Peninsula Clarion)
Photos courtesy John Schoen
Mary Beth Schoen admires a large-tree old-growth stand in Saook Bay on northeastern Baranof Island. Some individual trees were over 6 feet in diameter and many centuries old. This riparian area was adjacent to a salmon stream and was full of bear trails. Large-tree old growth stands are rare on the Tongass.
Photos courtesy John Schoen
Mary Beth Schoen admires a large-tree old-growth stand in Saook Bay on northeastern Baranof Island. Some individual trees were over 6 feet in diameter and many centuries old. This riparian area was adjacent to a salmon stream and was full of bear trails. Large-tree old growth stands are rare on the Tongass.
Photo by McKibben Jackinsky 
A crankie provides settings for artist Emily Schubert’s puppetry, as seen on April 17 at Bunnell Street Arts Center in Homer.

Visiting artist creates ‘multi-potentialities’ in art

Schubert’s work includes sculptural ‘rooms’ that tell stories

Photo by McKibben Jackinsky 
A crankie provides settings for artist Emily Schubert’s puppetry, as seen on April 17 at Bunnell Street Arts Center in Homer.
The cover of Anne Coray's novel, "Lost Mountain."

Review: New novel set near fictional Pebble Mine

Coray’s ‘Lost Mountain’ looks at personal, community conflict in setting where a large mine might happen.

The cover of Anne Coray's novel, "Lost Mountain."
The cover of Larry Baxter's novel, "Abandoned." (Photo by McKibben Jackinsky)

New book looks at legend of Alaska’s ‘Nantiinaq,’ or ‘giant hairy thing’

The possibility of the existence of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch, took root in young Baxter.

The cover of Larry Baxter's novel, "Abandoned." (Photo by McKibben Jackinsky)
Nancy Lord in a 2017 photo. (Photo by Irene Owsley and courtesy of Pier One Theatre)

Lord’s ‘The Frederick Cook Interview’ looks at polar explorer’s narcissism

‘The Frederick Cook Interview’ shows at 7 p.m. Friday on KBBI radio

Nancy Lord in a 2017 photo. (Photo by Irene Owsley and courtesy of Pier One Theatre)
Some of the works in Charles Aguilar's show opening Friday, March 5, 2021, at Grace Ridge Brewey in Homer, Alaska. (Photo courtesy of Grace Ridge Brewery)

Collage, puppet artist looks for ‘magik’ in his creations

Charles Aguilar’s latest show is at Grace Ridge Brewery

Some of the works in Charles Aguilar's show opening Friday, March 5, 2021, at Grace Ridge Brewey in Homer, Alaska. (Photo courtesy of Grace Ridge Brewery)
A collage of photographs surrounds the description of “Familiar Faces: Portrait of a Community,” on exhibit through May 2021 at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

New exhibit looks at connections between objects and portraits

Pratt Museum show also includes new work by photographers, writer

A collage of photographs surrounds the description of “Familiar Faces: Portrait of a Community,” on exhibit through May 2021 at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Bunnell Street Arts Center Artist in Residence Nina Elder’s work is displayed on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021, at the gallery in Homer, Alaska. At left are pieces from her series, “It Will Not Be the Same, But It Might Be Beautiful,” drawings of puzzle stones collected in the area near McCarthy, Alaska. At right is a drawing of frayed rope, part of her focus during her residency. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Visiting artist acknowledges ‘the brokenness but not throwing it away when it’s broken’

For Bunnell residency, artist also will look at frayed, found objects like rope and nets

Bunnell Street Arts Center Artist in Residence Nina Elder’s work is displayed on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021, at the gallery in Homer, Alaska. At left are pieces from her series, “It Will Not Be the Same, But It Might Be Beautiful,” drawings of puzzle stones collected in the area near McCarthy, Alaska. At right is a drawing of frayed rope, part of her focus during her residency. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Pratt Museum officials pose for a photograph while practicing social distancing on the museum lawn on Friday, May 15, 2020, in Homer, Alaska. From left to right are Jennifer Gibbins, executive director; Savanna Bradley, curator, and Marilyn Sigman, naturalist in residence. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Homer Arts groups look to post-pandemic future

Signs of hope include more in-person workshops, writers residencies.

Pratt Museum officials pose for a photograph while practicing social distancing on the museum lawn on Friday, May 15, 2020, in Homer, Alaska. From left to right are Jennifer Gibbins, executive director; Savanna Bradley, curator, and Marilyn Sigman, naturalist in residence. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Tom Kizzia, author of “The Wake of the Unseen Object,” in a photo taken Aug. 10, 2012, near Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Don Pitcher; courtesy of Tom Kizzia)

Local author’s ‘Wake of the Unseen Object’ back in print after 30 years

Literary travel book had roots in newspaper series about rural Alaska.

Tom Kizzia, author of “The Wake of the Unseen Object,” in a photo taken Aug. 10, 2012, near Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Don Pitcher; courtesy of Tom Kizzia)
Michael Armstrong / Homer News
“Tanner Crab with Barnacles” is one of the wood sculptural pieces in Kim Schuster’s exhibit, “Science Observed Through Art: Unsung Species,” as seen on Friday at Ptarmigan Arts in Homer.

Artist and scientist seeks to make science accessible through sculptures, paintings

Homer artist wants to spotlight marine animals that aren’t well known or well understood.

Michael Armstrong / Homer News
“Tanner Crab with Barnacles” is one of the wood sculptural pieces in Kim Schuster’s exhibit, “Science Observed Through Art: Unsung Species,” as seen on Friday at Ptarmigan Arts in Homer.