Pioneer Potluck: Pancakes and moose liver shared with friends.

  • By Grannie Annie
  • Tuesday, September 15, 2015 5:44pm
  • LifeFood

Nikiski, Alaska 1967

An appropriate article for this time of year.

 

Moose liver dredged in flour and fried in bacon grease was one of our first breakfasts in Alaska.* Actually it is very good, if the liver is taken care of and the cooker knows exactly what he is doing. In this case the moose liver and pancake cooker guy was Onis King. Float those pancakes in blueberry syrup! Oh YUMM! That was my first encounter with moose and the wonderful friendship of all those people that gathered at Onis and Anns place in 1967. They became my friends and to this day some of us who are left remain friends. Big mugs of strong black coffee was the other new way of life my future proceeded. I learned to drink coffee also!!

Until four years ago I did not know about chocolate chip pancakes. Bobs grandkids were visiting and that was requested most mornings. Since then my grandson, Grey requested them so often I bought him a “liddle griddle.” I prepared for him dry buttermilk pancake mix with chocolate chips mixed in so he can make his own. while he was in grade school, he told me when he grows up that is all he is going to eat! Well, he is grown up now and pancakes are still at the top of his breakfast list.

My friend, Bernie chops up apples and puts them in pancakes. Sprinkle the hot buttered pancakes with cinnamon and sugar.

My kids, when they were little, loved peanut butter on them, roll up and eat by hand.

Susan says I made them Mickey Mouse looking pancakes. Now they have different shaped pancake molds. I seem to remember one of the kids liked ketchup on their pancakes!! I am NOT saying who!!

Bob and I like fresh or frozen blueberries sprinkled on one side of cooking pancake. Bob likes left over cold pancakes spread with any kind of beans or refried beans, roll up. Try sliced strawberries, raspberries, walnuts, or mix cinnamon and nutmeg in batter. My very favorites.

I make raspberry and strawberry or current syrups or rhubarb-strawberry jam to go on top of hot pancakes.

Open a can of cherry or apple or peach pie filling and top a hot buttered pancake and a dollop of whipped cream. And don’t have them just for breakfast – they are a good suppertime filler upper.

The next time you have fresh moose liver, you have to try moose liver and pancakes floating in blueberry syrup.

 

Clean immediately with water and cool completely before placing in any container. DO NOT PLACE MOOSE LIVER OR HEART IN A PLASTIC BAG. IT HAS TO COOL FIRST. Wrap in cheese cloth. To prepare: Soak in clear cold water for one to two hours with about 2 tblsp of salt. This cleans the blood out. Slice and dredge in egg, milk or butter milk and then in flour. Fry as you would any other fried food, about 3 to 4 minutes on both sides. Test to see if cooked through. Do not over cook as it gives it the strong taste. Fry with onions, salt and pepper.

Enjoy!

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