PFD

The Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation building in October 2020. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire file)

Study: PFD increases spending on kids among low-income families

New study looks at PFD spending by parents

 

This photo shows the trans-Alaska pipeline and pump station north of Fairbanks. (AP Photo/Al Grillo)

Alaska Voices: The permanent fund has been taking care of Alaskans for 45 years

It’s the largest sovereign wealth fund in the nation, the pride of Alaska and this month we celebrate its 45th anniversary.

 

The doors of the Alaska Senate chambers were shut Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, a week into the Alaska State Legislature’s fourth special session of the year. Gov. Mike Dunleavy called lawmakers to session to resolve the state’s longterm fiscal issues, but the same divisions that have kept lawmakers from finding resolution before are still in place. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
The doors of the Alaska Senate chambers were shut Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, a week into the Alaska State Legislature’s fourth special session of the year. Gov. Mike Dunleavy called lawmakers to session to resolve the state’s longterm fiscal issues, but the same divisions that have kept lawmakers from finding resolution before are still in place. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Alaskans pick up and turn in Permanent Fund Dividend applications at the Department of Revenue office in the State Office Building in March 2011. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)

Dividend payments expected in 30 days

Payments of $1,100 set for mid-October

Alaskans pick up and turn in Permanent Fund Dividend applications at the Department of Revenue office in the State Office Building in March 2011. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Senators converse during an At Ease in a floor session of the Alaska State Senate on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. Senators passed a budget bill with a Permanent Fund Dividend of $1,100, but there’s disagreement over the fund sources that may lead to legal action. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Senators converse during an At Ease in a floor session of the Alaska State Senate on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. Senators passed a budget bill with a Permanent Fund Dividend of $1,100, but there’s disagreement over the fund sources that may lead to legal action. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Alaska state Sens. Bert Stedman, left, and Natasha von Imhof listen during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. Legislators are meeting in a special session, which is expected to end Tuesday. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)

PFD unsettled as special session nears end

Legislators have spent most of this year in regular or special legislative sessions, with this year’s payout unresolved.

Alaska state Sens. Bert Stedman, left, and Natasha von Imhof listen during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Saturday, Sept. 11, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. Legislators are meeting in a special session, which is expected to end Tuesday. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
House Speaker Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, center, leaves the House chambers on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2021 following marathon floor sessions that morning and Monday night. The House passed an appropriations bill but not before members of the minority voiced deep objections.
Peter Segall / Juneau Empire
House Speaker Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, center, leaves the House chambers on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2021 following marathon floor sessions that morning and Monday night. The House passed an appropriations bill but not before members of the minority voiced deep objections.
From left to right, House Majority Leader Chris Tuck, D-Anchorage; House Minority Leader Cathy Tilton, R-Wasilla and Reps. Mike Prax, R-North Pole; Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski and George Rauscher, R-Sutton, speak on the floor of the Alaska House of Representatives following a floor session on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021. Lawmakers found themselves debating familiar topics as they worked through amendments to a budget bill. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
From left to right, House Majority Leader Chris Tuck, D-Anchorage; House Minority Leader Cathy Tilton, R-Wasilla and Reps. Mike Prax, R-North Pole; Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski and George Rauscher, R-Sutton, speak on the floor of the Alaska House of Representatives following a floor session on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021. Lawmakers found themselves debating familiar topics as they worked through amendments to a budget bill. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks at an Anchorage news conference on Dec. 11, 2020. (Courtesy photo/Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)

Dunleavy: Still fighting for Alaskan families

“I was left with little choice but to veto both the PFD and legislative per diem.”

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks at an Anchorage news conference on Dec. 11, 2020. (Courtesy photo/Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks June 17, 2021 news conference at the Alaska State Capitol. (Peter Segall/Juneau Empire file)

Dunleavy OKs earnings transfer after veto error

Dunleavy last week said one of his more significant vetoes was the $4 billion transfer.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks June 17, 2021 news conference at the Alaska State Capitol. (Peter Segall/Juneau Empire file)
Alaska Senate President Peter Micciche prepares for the start of a brief Senate floor session on Tuesday, June 15, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. Lawmakers were trying to reach resolution on a state spending package during the special legislative session. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)

Budget talks break down as shutdown looms

Legislative leadership met for most of the day Tuesday.

Alaska Senate President Peter Micciche prepares for the start of a brief Senate floor session on Tuesday, June 15, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. Lawmakers were trying to reach resolution on a state spending package during the special legislative session. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
Rep. Neal Foster, D-Nome, at center, chairs the first meeting of a bicameral conference committee tasked with negotiating the state's final budget bill in the Senate Finance Committee chambers on Wednesday, May 26, 2021. Lawmakers had said they wanted to finish before Memorial Day, but Foster said that didn't seem like a possibility. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Rep. Neal Foster, D-Nome, at center, chairs the first meeting of a bicameral conference committee tasked with negotiating the state's final budget bill in the Senate Finance Committee chambers on Wednesday, May 26, 2021. Lawmakers had said they wanted to finish before Memorial Day, but Foster said that didn't seem like a possibility. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Proclamations from Gov. Mike Dunleavy calling special sessions of the Alaska State Legislature for late May and early August were posted in the otherwise quiet office of the House Clerk on Friday, May 21, 2021. The first special session has started but the Capitol building was quiet as most of the work before lawmakers will take place in committee. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Proclamations from Gov. Mike Dunleavy calling special sessions of the Alaska State Legislature for late May and early August were posted in the otherwise quiet office of the House Clerk on Friday, May 21, 2021. The first special session has started but the Capitol building was quiet as most of the work before lawmakers will take place in committee. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Senate President Peter Micciche, R-Soldotna, spoke to reporters in his office on Thursday, May 20, 2021, to discuss next steps after the Senate debated the state budget until just before midnight the night before. Senators voted for a Permanent Fund Dividend of $2,300, the largest in history, but negotiations with the House of Representatives are still to come. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Senate President Peter Micciche, R-Soldotna, spoke to reporters in his office on Thursday, May 20, 2021, to discuss next steps after the Senate debated the state budget until just before midnight the night before. Senators voted for a Permanent Fund Dividend of $2,300, the largest in history, but negotiations with the House of Representatives are still to come. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
House Minority Leader Rep. Cathy Tilton, R-Wasilla, seen here speaking with Rep. David Eastman, R-Wasilla, speak in the hall of the Alaska State Capitol on Feb. 16, 2021, said the minority caucus is working on proposals for the annual Permanent Fund Dividend. The Legislature is approaching the end of the session, but has yet to allocate an amount for a PFD. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
House Minority Leader Rep. Cathy Tilton, R-Wasilla, seen here speaking with Rep. David Eastman, R-Wasilla, speak in the hall of the Alaska State Capitol on Feb. 16, 2021, said the minority caucus is working on proposals for the annual Permanent Fund Dividend. The Legislature is approaching the end of the session, but has yet to allocate an amount for a PFD. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
The Senate Finance Committee, seen here with chair Sen. Bert Stedman, R-Sitka, leading a meeting on Jan. 27, discussed Monday Gov. Mike Dunleavy's propsoal for a $1.4 billion supplemental budget. Most of that money would go to paying out a supplemental Permanent Fund Dividend. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
The Senate Finance Committee, seen here with chair Sen. Bert Stedman, R-Sitka, leading a meeting on Jan. 27, discussed Monday Gov. Mike Dunleavy's propsoal for a $1.4 billion supplemental budget. Most of that money would go to paying out a supplemental Permanent Fund Dividend. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. ( Courtesy Photo / Austin McDaniel, Office of the Governor)

Dunleavy pitches dividend change amid legislative splits

No clear direction has emerged from lawmakers.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. ( Courtesy Photo / Austin McDaniel, Office of the Governor)
Larry Persily

Alaska Voices: The Permanent Fund divide

It will take a lot of compromise to reach an affordable dividend and decent public services.

Larry Persily
The Capitol building in Juneau, Alaska. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire File)

Voices of the Peninsula: Dividends don’t grow on trees

“Without taxing for the extraction of our oil, there will be no dividends.”

The Capitol building in Juneau, Alaska. (Peter Segall | Juneau Empire File)