The Seward Boat Harbor can be seen on Sept. 24, 2021, in Seward, Alaska. (Photo by Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion)

The Seward Boat Harbor can be seen on Sept. 24, 2021, in Seward, Alaska. (Photo by Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion)

New seafood processor to set up shop in Seward

Bornstein Seafoods has taken over Polar Seafood’s lease on the east side of Resurrection Bay

Seward will be the newest location for a seafood processing facility out of the Lower 48, according to city officials.

Stephen Sowell, Seward’s assistant city manager, confirmed on Tuesday that Bornstein Seafoods has taken over Polar Seafood’s lease on the east side of Resurrection Bay.

Bornstein is a seafood processor out of Bellingham, Washington, with locations in state as well as in Oregon. The Seward operation is the first wholly owned facility in Alaska.

Brandii Holmdahl, Bornstein’s vice president of strategic development, said she took the lead on the expansion project because she was already familiar with the Kenai Peninsula. She grew up in Soldotna and lived in Seward for many years.

“I got involved again quickly,” Holmdahl said.

The owner of Polar Seafood reached out to Bornstein to see if the company was interested in expanding to Alaska and taking over the lease in the summer of 2021, she said.

“The discussion started last early summer, and I moved to Seward in July to start working on the process of transitioning it over,” Holmdahl said. “And (it) became official in September.”

According to Bornstein’s website, the Seward location will process a variety of species: salmon, halibut, black cod, cod and pollock.

“The majority of our portfolio is made up of crab and shrimp and whiting and rockfish, traditionally,” Holmdahl said. “And so the access to black cod and halibut, pacific cod and salmon is really what the Alaska acquisition brings for us.”

Kat Sorensen, the executive director of the Seward Chamber of Commerce, said Tuesday that there is hope a new seafood processing facility will boost the city’s economy.

“In the summer, tourism is definitely the majority of our business,” she said. “But with that said, it varies. And we do have a diverse economy that includes the marine industry and fishing industry, for sure.”

Seward’s tourism industry, as well as the fishing industry, have both been disrupted the last two summers because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re excited from the chamber side to see another expansion on the marine and fishing industry in the community, and the business and job growth,” Sorensen said.

Bornstein Seafoods is currently hiring for the 2022 season, which runs from mid-March through October, according to the company’s Facebook page.

Reach reporter Camille Botello at camille.botello@peninsulaclarion.com.

More in News

Spencer McLean and his daughter, Emma McLean, show their support for Proposition 3, through which a new CES Station 1 would be constructed in Soldotna, on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2022, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Blustery weather, average turnout mark municipal election day

Up for consideration this year were city council, board of education and assembly seats, as well as a handful of propositions affecting borough schools, emergency services and legislative representation

Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander sits inside Kenai City Hall on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Ostrander to leave City of Kenai in January

Ostrander has served as the city manager since 2017

Melanie Hardin, right, greets the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp.’s Board of Trustees before her interview for the APFC’s executive director’s job Monday, Oct. 3, 2022, in Juneau, (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Permanent Fund board picks new executive director

Trustees work overtime selecting from three candidates after interviews Monday

A sign welcoming visitors to the Literary Haunted House at the Kenai Community Library can be seen here on Oct. 30, 2019. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
A sign welcoming visitors to the Literary Haunted House at the Kenai Community Library can be seen here on Oct. 30, 2019. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion file)
Libraries host haunted houses, scary storytimes, seasonal crafts

It’s all about Halloween at Kenai and Soldotna libraries

Kenai Fire Marshal Jeremy Hamilton is seen by one of Kenai Fire Department’s Tower trucks on Friday, Sept. 30, 2022 at Kenai Fire Department in Kenai, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
‘Get up, get out and get safe’

Kids taught about fire safety as part of prevention effort

Bob Bird, left, chairman of the Alaskan Independence Party, and former Lt. Gov. Loren Leman make the case in favor of a state constitutional convention during a debate in Anchorage broadcast Thursday by Alaska Public Media. (Screenshot from Alaska Public Media’s YouTube channel)
Constitutional convention debate gets heated

Abortion, PFD factor into forum.

Carol Freas (right) helps a voter fill out absentee election materials in Kenai City Hall ahead of the Oct. 4 municipal election on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Absentee voting already underway

Absentee in-person voting has been made available across the borough

Graphic by Ashlyn O’Hara
Graphic by Ashlyn O’Hara
What’s on the ballot: Reapportionment, new field house, school bond

Voters will decide on ballot measures that address schools, public safety and legislative bodies

Cars line up ahead of dismissal at Mountain View Elementary School on Thursday, September 29, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. A bond package up for consideration by Kenai Peninsula Borough voters on Oct. 4 would fund improvements to the school’s traffic flow. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
‘Critical needs’: Parking lot problems

Lack of space for pickup and drop-offs creates traffic jam at elementary school

Most Read