Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly member Brent Johnson address a small crowd of people during a borough public hearing held Monday, March 9, 2020 at the Kenai Peninsula Fairgrounds in Ninilchik, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)

Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly member Brent Johnson address a small crowd of people during a borough public hearing held Monday, March 9, 2020 at the Kenai Peninsula Fairgrounds in Ninilchik, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)

Borough to consider banning smoking in buildings

Current code only bans smoking in assembly chambers during meetings and session.

With one exception, the Kenai Peninsula Borough Code of Ordinances doesn’t prohibit smoking in borough buildings. Assembly Vice President Brent Johnson is working to change that.

Chapter 10.08 of borough code describes “Prohibition of Smoking” rules in the borough. That chapter has two sections, the first of which says that “Smoking is prohibited in the assembly room of the Kenai Peninsula Borough at any time that the assembly is in session at a public meeting.” That chapter was approved by the assembly in 1980 and passed by a vote of 10-6.

The ordinance up for consideration by the assembly on Tuesday would amend the section with language prohibiting smoking in borough buildings and vehicles and adding fines for violations of the policies.

Johnson said Thursday that he encountered the borough’s existing smoking code while doing research for a different issue, which motivated him to bring the legislation forward. The ordinance was approved for introduction by the assembly during their Sept. 7 meeting and will be up for a public hearing on Tuesday.

Johnson said he was proud when the Alaska Legislature passed a statewide ban on smoking in bars, restaurants and other public places. That bill, sponsored by Sen. Peter Micciche, R-Soldotna, passed in 2018. Johnson said Thursday that his ordinance would bring the borough into compliance with state statute.

State statute prohibits smoking in enclosed public spaces “at a place of government or public assembly located on property that is owned or operated by the state, a municipality, or a regional educational attendance area” or that is owned by an agent of those entities. Rules are also provided for smoking in outdoor spaces.

“KPB 10.08 has not been amended in over 40 years and should reflect current Alaska law,” the legislation says.

If approved, the legislation up for consideration on Tuesday would ban smoking in:

All enclosed properties owned or controlled by the Kenai Peninsula Borough

All areas within 20 feet of each entrance to enclosed areas on properties owned or controlled by the Kenai Peninsula Borough

Outdoors within 10 feet of playground equipment at a public school

All areas within 50 feet of each entrance to a Kenai Peninsula Borough service area hospital

All vehicles owned, operated or controlled by the Kenai Peninsula Borough

The legislation would also implement a $100 fine for violation of any of those provisions.

Tuesday’s meeting of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly can be streamed live on the borough’s website at kpb.legistar.us.

Reach reporter Ashlyn O’Hara at ashlyn.ohara@peninsulaclarion.com.

More in News

Central Emergency Services staff wait to receive doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on Friday, Dec. 18, 2020, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Assembly mulls bond for new CES fire station

Replacement of the current station is estimated to cost $16.5 million

Buldozers sit outside of the former Kenai Bowling Alley on Thursday, June 23, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Old Kenai bowling alley comes down

The business closed in 2015

Landslide debris surrounds part of Lowell Point Road on Friday, June 3, 2022, in Seward, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Assembly looks to mitigate future Lowell Point Road dangers

Assembly members approved legislation supporting agencies working to address the “repetitive hazards”

The Alaska Department of Health And Social Services building in Juneau has no visible signs indicating the department is splitting into two agencies as of Friday. Top officials at the department said many of the changes, both physical and in services, are likely weeks and in some cases months away. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Little sign of big change for DHSS

No commissioner at new department, other Department of Health and Social Services changes may take months

Nate Rochon cleans fish after dipnetting in the Kasilof River, on June 25, 2019, in Kasilof, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
King closures continue; Kasilof dipnet opens Saturday

The early-run Kenai River king sport fishery remains closed, and fishing for kings of any size is prohibited

An "Al Gross for Congress" sign sits near the driveway to Gross’ home in Anchorage, Alaska, on Tuesday, June 21, 2022, after he announced plans to withdraw from the U.S. House race. Gross has given little explanation in two statements for why he is ending his campaign, and a woman who answered the door at the Gross home asked a reporter to leave the property. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
Alaska judge rules Sweeney won’t advance to special election

JUNEAU — A state court judge ruled Friday that Alaska elections officials… Continue reading

Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion 
Soldotna City Manager Stephanie Queen listens to a presentation from Alaska Communications during a meeting of the Soldotna City Council on Wednesday, March 9, 2022 in Soldotna, Alaska.
ACS pilots fiber program in certain peninsula neighborhoods

The fiber to the home service will make available the fastest internet home speeds on the peninsula

Nurse Tracy Silta draws a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the walk-in clinic at the intersection of the Kenai Spur and Sterling Highways in Soldotna, Alaska on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. COVID-19 vaccines for kids younger than 5 years old are now approved by both the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Camille Botello / Peninsula Clarion)
COVID shots for kids under 5 available at public health

Roughly 18 million kids nationwide will now be eligible to get their COVID vaccines.

Most Read