The Bookworm Sez: Steamy bedrooms and cold revenge

The Bookworm Sez: Steamy bedrooms and cold revenge

Catch me if you can.

You might have said that once, giggling. You may have yelled it at a game one afternoon. You said it, maybe, in a flirtatious manner on some romantic evening. Run, run, run, catch me if you can because, as in “Man on the Run” by Carl Weber (c.2017, Grand Central Publishing, $25, 309 pages), this chase may keep a man out of prison.

The night Kyle Richmond learned that his best friend, Jay Crawford, had busted out of prison was unusually memorable: Kyle and his wife were naked in their hot tub when U.S. Marshalls broke in and surprised them. The Feds were sure that Jay had contacted Kyle, in search of money and a place to hide.

The Marshalls had shown up at Wil Duncan’s office that afternoon, too, but they quickly learned that Wil didn’t know where Jay was. Wil was best friends with his boy, Jay, for years but that didn’t mean he was a regular visitor at the prison. Truth: he hadn’t seen Jay in ages. No, Wil had enough problems, with his job and his powerful uncle putting the pressure on him to join the “family business.”

Jay’s other best friend, Allen, wasn’t visited by the U.S. Marshalls – maybe because he’d never gone to see Jay in prison. He had his hands full just keeping his beautiful wife, Cassie, happy, so instead, Allen anonymously put money in Jay’s commissary fund and sent him gifts, but his name was not tied to the criminal Jay Crawford.

It was quite a surprise that Jay showed up on Allen’s doorstep, looking for help.

Ten years ago, Jay Crawford was accused of raping a woman, but she’d set him up. He was innocent and because of that, he wasn’t about to take the rap for anything, even if it meant parole – and so, he escaped from prison instead. He figured he could count on his three best friends to help a guy out.

He never figured that his friends would be the ones who’d need help…

Confession time: I’d stopped reading author Carl Weber’s novels a few books ago. I was getting tired of all the women, beautiful, and all the men, criminal. Same-same-same, and it was no fun. But with “Man on the Run,” I’m glad I came back into the fold.

The women are still all beautiful here and the men still get into trouble, but this book arcs back into some old Weber favorites from many years past. Savvy, long-time readers will remember many hearts and laws broken, as well as a lot of hot mattresses and cold revenge. You’ll welcome all of them back as Weber takes readers again into his beloved Queens , to backstabbing boardrooms, steamy bedrooms, and businesses that are never as innocent as they seem.

Yes, it’s over-the-top, but this book just feels better than prior ones. Once you’ve read it and gotten over its slippery little cliffhanger, in fact, you’ll be hungry for the next installment. In the meantime, “Man on the Run” is the book to catch.

The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Email her at bookwormsez@yahoo.com.

More in Life

This 1940s-era image is one of few early photographs of Cliff House, which once stood near the head of Tustumena Lake. (Photo courtesy of the Secora Collection)
Twists and turns in the history of Cliff House — Part 1

Here, then, is the story of Cliff House, as least as I know it now.

File
Minister’s Message: What’s in a name?

The Scriptures advise, “A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches.”

Visitors put on personal protective equipment before an artist talk by Dr. Sami Ali' at the Jan. 7, 2022, First Friday opening of her exhibit, "The Mind of a Healthcare Worker During the COVID-19 Pandemic," at the Homer Council on the Arts in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
ER doctor’s paintings follow passage of pandemic

Dr. Sami Ali made 2019 resolution to paint every day — and then the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

Almond flour adds a nuttiness to this carrot cake topped with cream cheese frosting. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: A ‘perfect day’ cake

Carrot cake and cream cheese frosting make for a truly delicious day off

File
Minister’s Message: A prayer pulled from the ashes

“In that beleaguered and beautiful land, the prayer endures.”

A copy of “The Year of Magical Thinking” by author Joan Didion is displayed on an e-reader. (Photo by Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Off the Shelf: Didion’s “Year of Magical Thinking” is a timely study on grief

‘The last week of 2021 felt like a good time to pick up one of her books.’

Megan Pacer / Homer News
Artist Asia Freeman, third from left, speaks to visitors on Nov. 1, 2019, at a First Friday art exhibit opening at Kachemak Bay Campus in Homer.
Freeman wins Governor’s Arts Humanities Award

Bunnell Street Arts Center artistic director is one of nine honored.

Zirrus VanDevere’s pieces are displayed at the Kenai Art Center on Jan. 4, 2022. (Courtesy Alex Rydlinski)
A journey of healing

VanDevere mixes shape, color and dimension in emotional show

Traditional ingredients like kimchi, ramen and tofu are mixed with American comfort food Spam in this hearty Korean stew. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Warm up with army base stew

American soldiers introduced local cooks to some American staple ingredients of the time: Spam and hotdogs.

File
Peninsula Crime: Bad men … and dumb ones — Part 2

Here, in Part Two and gleaned from local newspapers, are a few examples of the dim and the dumb.

File
Minister’s Message: What if Christ had not been born?

It is now time to look at the work and life of Jesus Christ.

Homemade masa makes the base of these Mexican gorditas. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Tasty trial and error

Homemade gorditas present new cooking challenge.