Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  Clarissa Frey's plaster cast "Float" hangs on one wall in the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery Wednesday April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska. A student art show will be on display through May 2, in the gallery.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Clarissa Frey's plaster cast "Float" hangs on one wall in the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery Wednesday April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska. A student art show will be on display through May 2, in the gallery.

Talent on display at student art exhibition

A watercolor Harry Potter snatches a golden snitch from the sky on one end of the gallery, while a human-sized cardboard and burlap creation dominates the entrance to the show at the student art exhibition on the Kenai Peninsula College, Kenai River campus.

The show, open until May 2, features 29 students and a mixture of mediums from sculpture and painting to drawing, 3-D modeling and digital photography — it’s an amalgamation of objects and styles put together by local artists Bill Heath and Marion Nelson.

The two chose complementary pieces from student submissions and will award best in show, jurors choice and honorable mentions on May 2, for a 3:30-5:30 p.m. closing reception of the exhibit.

“It’s exposure to the general public that goes beyond the classroom,” said Cam Choy, associate professor of art at the college. “By submitting works, they experience the process that all artists have to go through.”

Typically the college hosts a student art show once a year, many of the pieces are up for sale.

This year’s show has several more sculpture pieces than have been seen in previous years.

Choy, a sculptor, said he was hired recently to teach art at the college and the composition of the show was a reflection of his direction and what he taught.

Several of the larger forms are part of a 3-D modeling class that requires students who start with a hand-sized clay model and then scale the form to a much larger size using cardboard.

The process teaches them to work with their hands and develop problem-solving skills, Choy said.

Student Chelsea Springer’s “Honey,” drew the eye of the judges and, Choy said, “It had a presence that drew them in almost immediately.”

The delicate plaster cast piece is set in a wooden frame and hanging near the entrance — it drew the attention of several people who passed through the gallery Wednesday.

“I just want to take that one home,” said Nicole Lopez, student aid. “Fortunately, it’s for sale.”

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  Kenai Peninsula College, Kenai River Campus student Chelsea Springer's "Disguise" dominates the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery during the student art show April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska. Springer and 28 other students are featured in the show which will run through May 2 in the Brockel building.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Kenai Peninsula College, Kenai River Campus student Chelsea Springer’s “Disguise” dominates the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery during the student art show April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska. Springer and 28 other students are featured in the show which will run through May 2 in the Brockel building.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  Cam Choy, associate professor of Art at Kenai Peninsula College - Kenai River Campus, talks to one of his classes about a watercolor piece in the student art show Wednesday April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska.  The show will be on display through May 2 in the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery in the Brockel building.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Cam Choy, associate professor of Art at Kenai Peninsula College – Kenai River Campus, talks to one of his classes about a watercolor piece in the student art show Wednesday April 16, 2014 in Soldotna, Alaska. The show will be on display through May 2 in the Gary L. Freeburg art gallery in the Brockel building.

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