One of the exhibits in “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

One of the exhibits in “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Pratt Museum unveils new ‘Entangled’ exhibit

Last month, the Pratt Museum reopened on a scaled-back basis with its summer show, “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay.”

Put together by Pratt Curator Savanna Bradley and Naturalist-in-residence Marilyn Sigman, the exhibit looks at the history of collecting both in general and in the context of the museum.

“This exhibit allows us to share some of our favorite things from the Pratt’s permanent collections that you may have never seen before, and hopefully inspires everyone to share or contemplate their own collection stories,” Bradley said.

Bringing together artistic whimsy and the study of natural history, the family-friendly exhibit invites visitors to consider the origins of natural history collecting in the Western tradition for both individuals and museums. It also looks at how the ways people practice culture and what we notice about our environment are shifting.

As part of the exhibit, the Pratt holds several Zoom discussions, “Windowsill Stories: Exploring the Found Items of Our Homes and Neighborhoods,” with the next event from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 13. Share stories about an item in your home and listen to the stories of others. To register, visit bit.ly/3gk6vJx or www.prattmuseum.org/event/windowsill-stories/.

Summer hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Masks and social distancing are required, with no more than 10 visitors at a time. Visitors also must sign in. “Entangled” shows through Sept. 30.

The description for “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

The description for “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

More in Life

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: Heading into the homestretch

Christmas came to Kenai on schedule, if a little modified and subdued from years past.

A simple and classic spice cake made for a friend’s birthday, photographed on Oct. 21, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
A simple spice cake for a pared-down Thanksgiving

I know Thanksgiving this year won’t be the same.

Friends of Elmer Gaede effect repairs to the doctor’s Maule Rocket airplane, which crashed a short distance from Forest Lane between Soldotna and Sterling on Aug. 2, 1967. The airplane was eventually made “fly-able” again and was sold in the early 1970s. (Photo courtesy of the Gaede Collection)
Dr. Gaede drops in, Part 2

By Clark Fair For the Peninsula Clarion Author’s note: This is Part… Continue reading

Nick Varney
Unhinged Alaska: A guide to the seasons

Figuring out the signs of seasonal change is easy, right?

Several pages from David Brame's "After the Rain," adapted from Nnedi Okorafor’s short story “On the Road.” (Photo courtesy David Brame)
New Homer creator brings Afrofuturism to town

David Brame’s new graphic novel will be published in January

Essential ingredients for my family’s lemon cake recipe, photographed on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Great-grandma’s lemon cake

It’s not much, but it’s also everything.

A match latte is on display on Jan. 3, 2019 at Brother’s Cafe, in Kenai, Alaska.
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Something warm please

I’m normally not a warm drink person.

A row of dyed silk wall hangings shows how common Alaska plants found on the lower Kenai Peninsula can be used to make organic dyes, as seen here Tuesday. The hangings are included in Elissa Pettibone’s exhibit, “Swatches,” showing at Bunnell Street Arts Center in Homer.
Michael Armstrong / Homer News
‘Swatches’ explores art of organic dyeing using native plants

Pettibone finds magic in fireweed, other common plants

Dr. Elmer Gaede relaxes at home a few weeks after his airplane crash. His facial hair and glasses hide much of his scarring. (Photo courtesy of the Gaede Collection)
Dr. Gaede drops in, Part 1

Part 1 of a three-part story of a single-engine airplane crash more than a half-century ago.

Pepperoni pizza is ready to go into the oven, on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Election night pizza

It’s a time-honored tradition to have pizza in the newsroom on election night.

Virginia Walters (Courtesy photo)
Life in the Pedestrian Lane: The race is on

Here we are 33 weeks later wondering how we are going to celebrate the grandest time of the year.

Will Morrow (courtesy)
Keeping myself in stitches

The pandemic hit, and we all brushed off some skills we hadn’t thought about in a while.