One of the exhibits in “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

One of the exhibits in “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Pratt Museum unveils new ‘Entangled’ exhibit

Last month, the Pratt Museum reopened on a scaled-back basis with its summer show, “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay.”

Put together by Pratt Curator Savanna Bradley and Naturalist-in-residence Marilyn Sigman, the exhibit looks at the history of collecting both in general and in the context of the museum.

“This exhibit allows us to share some of our favorite things from the Pratt’s permanent collections that you may have never seen before, and hopefully inspires everyone to share or contemplate their own collection stories,” Bradley said.

Bringing together artistic whimsy and the study of natural history, the family-friendly exhibit invites visitors to consider the origins of natural history collecting in the Western tradition for both individuals and museums. It also looks at how the ways people practice culture and what we notice about our environment are shifting.

As part of the exhibit, the Pratt holds several Zoom discussions, “Windowsill Stories: Exploring the Found Items of Our Homes and Neighborhoods,” with the next event from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 13. Share stories about an item in your home and listen to the stories of others. To register, visit bit.ly/3gk6vJx or www.prattmuseum.org/event/windowsill-stories/.

Summer hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Masks and social distancing are required, with no more than 10 visitors at a time. Visitors also must sign in. “Entangled” shows through Sept. 30.

The description for “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

The description for “Entangled: Exploring Natural History Collections from Kachemak Bay,” as seen on July 13, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

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