Laerning for Life: Why use a food thermometer?

Using a food thermometer is the only sure way to determine if your food has reached a high enough temperature to destroy foodborne bacteria. Many people rely on “eyeballing” food. This can be misleading, especially if cooking by color. According to USDA research 1 out of 4 hamburgers turn brown in the middle before it has reached a safe internal temperature.

With Thanksgiving approaching a food thermometer is a must for the turkey, dressing and reheating leftovers. We have set up an identification activity for you to test your knowledge of internal temperatures of food. Participate in the activity and you will be entered to win a digital food thermometer before Thanksgiving.

While you are in our office pick up a free copy of “Use a Food Thermometer,” “Serving Turkey Safely,” and “Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart.”

We are located at 43961 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Suite A, Soldotna. This is the same building as Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Our office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Come on in; the activity will only take a few minutes.

For more information call us at 262-5824, or visit our website at http://www.uaf.edu/ces/districts/kenai/.

Submitted by Linda Tannehill, UAF School of Natural Resources and Extension; Cooperative Extension Service, Health, Home and Family Development, Kenai Peninsula District.

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