Alaska Natives

Joaqlin Estus / Indian Country Today
Athabascan singer and storyteller George Holly performs at the unveiling of a place-name marker at Chanshtnu, or “grassy creek,” the Dena’ina Athabascan name for Westchester Lagoon, on Aug. 3 in Anchorage.

New place names highlight Alaska city’s Dena’ina roots

‘Anchorage as a community is only about 100 years old, but our history goes back well over 1,000 years’

 

Alyssa London, second from right, and her team are working to produce Culture Story, which will showcase modern Alaska Native cultures across and outside of Alaska. (Courtesy photo / Culture Story)

Team works to tell positive, accurate stories about Alaska Native life

Show aims to show Alaska Native cultures as they thrive in the modern world.

 

This June 8, 2021, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, FIle)

Supreme Court sides with Alaska Natives in COVID-19 aid case

The $2.2 trillion legislation earmarked $8 billion for “Tribal governments” to cover expenses related to the pandemic.

This June 8, 2021, file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, FIle)
A graphic from the Vaccine Materials in Alaska Native Languages project shows a person who was recently vaccinated against COVID-19. Translated from Tlingit to English, it says “I want us to be among each other, that is why I got the shot. I love the people I am with.” (Photo provided)

Vaccine information available in Native languages

The organizations worked in tandem for two months to make the translation project possible.

A graphic from the Vaccine Materials in Alaska Native Languages project shows a person who was recently vaccinated against COVID-19. Translated from Tlingit to English, it says “I want us to be among each other, that is why I got the shot. I love the people I am with.” (Photo provided)
In this Juneau Empire file photo, Former Sen. Albert Kookesh, D-Angoon, tells his favorite Dr. Walter Soboleff stories during a celebration of Dr. Soboleff at the Walter Soboleff Center on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)
In this Juneau Empire file photo, Former Sen. Albert Kookesh, D-Angoon, tells his favorite Dr. Walter Soboleff stories during a celebration of Dr. Soboleff at the Walter Soboleff Center on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)
In this April 22, 2021, photo, signs of spring thaw appear along the Tazlina River in Tazlina, Alaska. The Catholic Church wants to sell 462 acres that once housed the Copper Valley mission school to the Native Village of Tazlina, a federally recognized tribe. The tribe is scrambling to raise the nearly $1.9 million asking price so it can regain stewardship of its ancestral land. (John Tierney/Indian Country Today)

Alaska village eyes return of ancestral lands

A federally recognized tribe is scrambling to raise funds to regain stewardship of the lands.

In this April 22, 2021, photo, signs of spring thaw appear along the Tazlina River in Tazlina, Alaska. The Catholic Church wants to sell 462 acres that once housed the Copper Valley mission school to the Native Village of Tazlina, a federally recognized tribe. The tribe is scrambling to raise the nearly $1.9 million asking price so it can regain stewardship of its ancestral land. (John Tierney/Indian Country Today)
In this undated photo provided by the Tanana Chiefs Conference, shows PJ Simon, chief and chairman of the conference, from Fairbanks, Alaska, displaying a COVID-19 vaccination sticker. Alaska has been one of the leading states in the percentage of its population to be vaccinated against COVID-19. But some of Alaska’s highest vaccination rates have been in some of its most remote, hardest-to-access communities, where the toll of past flu or tuberculosis outbreaks hasn’t been forgotten. (Rachel Saylor/Tanana Chiefs Conference via AP)

Alaska tribal health groups distribute vaccine far and wide

“We live for our children. We want to bring that sense of normalcy back in our lives.”

In this undated photo provided by the Tanana Chiefs Conference, shows PJ Simon, chief and chairman of the conference, from Fairbanks, Alaska, displaying a COVID-19 vaccination sticker. Alaska has been one of the leading states in the percentage of its population to be vaccinated against COVID-19. But some of Alaska’s highest vaccination rates have been in some of its most remote, hardest-to-access communities, where the toll of past flu or tuberculosis outbreaks hasn’t been forgotten. (Rachel Saylor/Tanana Chiefs Conference via AP)
In this June 20, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington as a storm rolls in. The Supreme Court seems inclined to say that hundreds of millions of dollars in coronavirus relief money tied up by a court case should benefit Alaska Natives, rather than be spread more broadly among Native American tribes.The justices were hearing arguments April 19, 2021, in a case involving the massive pandemic relief package passed last year and signed into law by then-President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Court seems ready to send virus funds to Alaska Natives

The federal government set aside more than $530 million for the so-called ANCs.

In this June 20, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington as a storm rolls in. The Supreme Court seems inclined to say that hundreds of millions of dollars in coronavirus relief money tied up by a court case should benefit Alaska Natives, rather than be spread more broadly among Native American tribes.The justices were hearing arguments April 19, 2021, in a case involving the massive pandemic relief package passed last year and signed into law by then-President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
In this Oct. 28, 2016, photo provided by the Maniilaq Association, Alex Whiting, left, and Cyrus Harris, right, are observed by Chris Sannito, second from left, and Brian Himelbloom, third from left, of the Kodiak Seafood and Marine Science Center as they trim and clean seal blubber in Kotzebue, Alaska. In January 2021, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation approved seal oil to be served at a Maniilaq elder care home, believed to be a first for seal oil in the U.S.  (Maniilaq Association via AP)

Cultural ‘big deal’: Seal oil makes menu at Alaska care home

Seal oil is back on the menu for Inupiat elders.

In this Oct. 28, 2016, photo provided by the Maniilaq Association, Alex Whiting, left, and Cyrus Harris, right, are observed by Chris Sannito, second from left, and Brian Himelbloom, third from left, of the Kodiak Seafood and Marine Science Center as they trim and clean seal blubber in Kotzebue, Alaska. In January 2021, the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation approved seal oil to be served at a Maniilaq elder care home, believed to be a first for seal oil in the U.S.  (Maniilaq Association via AP)
Irene Lampe dances a robe for its First Dance ceremony at the Sealaska Heritage Institute on Monday, June 22, 2020. (Courtesy photo | Annie Bartholomew)

Weavers celebrate new robe with first dance

The event is part of a resurgent trend for traditional weaving.

Irene Lampe dances a robe for its First Dance ceremony at the Sealaska Heritage Institute on Monday, June 22, 2020. (Courtesy photo | Annie Bartholomew)
Peter Segall | Juneau Empire                                Alaska Native Sisterhood Grand President Paulette Moreno (front) speaks at the Alaska Native Issues Forum with Alaska Native Brotherhood Grand President Heather Gurko on Monday.
Peter Segall | Juneau Empire                                Alaska Native Sisterhood Grand President Paulette Moreno (front) speaks at the Alaska Native Issues Forum with Alaska Native Brotherhood Grand President Heather Gurko on Monday.
Hundreds gather to honor Alaska civil rights icon Elizabeth Peratrovich
Hundreds gather to honor Alaska civil rights icon Elizabeth Peratrovich
Alaska Native leaders say racial discrimination still affects communities
Alaska Native leaders say racial discrimination still affects communities
Bill would require state to officially recognize Alaska’s 229 tribes
Bill would require state to officially recognize Alaska’s 229 tribes
Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire                                Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl and Air Force Lt. Gen. Tom Bussiere, Commander for Alaskan Command, stand together following a day of meetings at SHI’s Walter Soboleff Building.

Setting it right: Military could apologize for bombarding Alaska Native villages

Three Southeast Alaska villages were bombarded by the military in the 1800s.

Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire                                Sealaska Heritage Institute President Rosita Worl and Air Force Lt. Gen. Tom Bussiere, Commander for Alaskan Command, stand together following a day of meetings at SHI’s Walter Soboleff Building.
Good golly, meet ‘Molly of Denali’

Good golly, meet ‘Molly of Denali’

The show involves Alaska Native characters, voice actors and writers.

Good golly, meet ‘Molly of Denali’
Larry Yazzie, of the Minnesota-based Native Pride Dancers, helps lead Native Youth Olympics participants and members of the crowd in a Circle Dance during the Native Youth Olympics Invitational at Kenai Middle School in January. (M. Scott Moon/Kenaitze Indian Tribe)

Native Pride Dancers return to Kenai to perform

The Native Pride Arts Dance Company is returning to Kenai tomorrow for the second time. The Native Pride Dancers visited in January and performed in… Continue reading

Larry Yazzie, of the Minnesota-based Native Pride Dancers, helps lead Native Youth Olympics participants and members of the crowd in a Circle Dance during the Native Youth Olympics Invitational at Kenai Middle School in January. (M. Scott Moon/Kenaitze Indian Tribe)