When calling 9-1-1, details are important

  • By Tammy Goggia
  • Thursday, April 3, 2014 8:22pm
  • Opinion

Everyone knows that 9-1-1 is a universal number that should be called in the event of an emergency … or do they? 9-1-1 centers all over the United States have encountered hurdles when educating the public about 9-1-1 and its uses. April is National 911 Education Month, and there’s a major effort under way to educate people about the importance and appropriate use of 911 services. With all the advances in technology, 9-1-1 has become much more complex. What began as a simple concept has grown into an amazing infrastructure that needs crucial attention.

An informed caller is 9-1-1’s best caller. It’s important that you know how to help 9-1-1 help you. In an emergency, seconds matter, so being knowledgeable and prepared can make all the difference. Tips everyone should know before dialing 9-1-1:

■ 9-1-1 is for law enforcement, fire and medical emergencies.

■ If you call 9-1-1, never hang up — you may have called 9-1-1 by accident. If that occurs, it is important to let the 9-1-1 dispatcher know.

■ Know where you are. This is the most important information you can provide as a 9-1-1 caller. Be aware of your surroundings. Make an effort to be as detailed as possible. If you are outside and don’t know the street address, look for landmarks or cross streets.

■ Know the capabilities of the devices you’re using. 9-1-1 can be contacted from almost every device that can make phone calls, but the callback and location information that accompanies your call to the 9-1-1 center can vary drastically among technologies and between geographic regions.

■ Stay on the line with the 9-1-1 dispatcher and answer all questions. The more information they have, the better they are able to help you. Their questions do not delay a response.

This information is provided by Tammy Goggia, Soldotna Public Safety Communications Center Communications Center Manager.

More in Opinion

Sens. Shelley Hughes, R-Palmer, left, and Robert Myers, R-North Pole, read through one of 41 amendments submitted to the state’s omnibus budget bill being debate on the floor of the Alaska State Senate on Monday, May 9, 2022. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Opinion: The Alaska Senate’s foolish gamble

“All these conservative people just spent all our money”

Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships. (logo provided)
Point of View: A few ideas for Mental Health Awareness Month

What are some things you can practice this month and subsequently apply to your life?

Alex Koplin is a founding member of Kenai Peninsula Votes. (courtesy photo)
Voices of the Peninsula: 1 candidate dined, 47 to go

By Alex Koplin Last month, I wrote a satirical piece for the… Continue reading

Smoke from the Swan Lake Fire impairs visibility on the Sterling Highway on Aug. 20, 2019. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Opinion: Alaskans should prepare for wildfire season

Several past large fire seasons followed snowy winters or unusually rainy springs

The logo of the Homer Trails Alliance.
Point of View: Connecting our community through trails

Homer is booming with housing development and the viability of long-standing trails is threatened

A copy of the State of Alaska Official Ballot for the June 11, 2022, Special Primary Election is photographed on May 2, 2022. (Peninsula Clarion staff)
How do I choose a candidate for this Special Primary Election?

You could start by making a list of your top choices with the issues they support that you care about

The Swan Lake Fire can be seen from above on Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. (Photo courtesy Alaska Wildland Fire Information)
Opinion: Supporting and protecting Alaskans during breakup and fire season

Our mantra is Team Alaska — we are here to help Alaskans and our communities.

Most Read