What others say: Southeast needs a seat on advisory board

  • By Ketchikan Daily News editorial
  • Monday, September 18, 2017 10:47am
  • Opinion

Ketchikan and southern Southeast Alaska will want to be represented on the new Highway Advisory Board.

Gov. Bill Walker established the board earlier this month. The board will mimic the Alaska Marine Highway System advisory board and be as important to the communities of Southeast.

Seven Alaskans will be asked to serve on the board, representing the commercial trucking industry, municipalities and rural areas of the state. Terms will be for four years.

The highway board will provide input into the building and repair of Alaska’s roaded infrastructure. While most of the state’s roaded highways are in other regions of the state, Southeast isn’t without its own, and their maintenance is a common topic in Southeast communities.

“Every single Alaskan interacts with our road system somehow — commuting, delivering goods and services, or simply to enjoy the beauty of the Last Frontier,” Walker says. “Maintaining Alaskans’ quality of life means maintaining our roads and bridges .”

Ketchikan and other Southeast communities are fortunate in the roads the state has built in the region, and many of those are being maintained well. But, like with most things, the work is never done.

Southeast shouldn’t be without representation on the board. And, a Ketchikan representative would do as well as one from any other community in the region.

— Ketchikan Daily News,

Sept. 13

More in Opinion

Ballot booths are set up inside Kenai City Hall on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Perspective from an election worker

Here is what I know about our Kenai Peninsula Borough election system

Apayauq Reitan, the first transgender woman to participate in the Iditarod, tells the House Education Committee on March 30, 2023, why she opposes a bill restricting transgender rights. (Mark Sabbatini/Juneau Empire file photo)
Opinion: The imaginary transgender sports crisis

House Bill 183 is a right-wing solution to a problem that doesn’t exist now and never will.

Sen. Jesse Bjorkman, a Nikiski Republican, speaks in favor of overriding a veto of Senate Bill 140 during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Sen. Jesse Bjorkman: Session ends with budget, dividend and bills passed

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

The Alaska State Capitol. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Listen to PAs; support Senate Bill 115: Modernizing PA Practice in Alaska

Health care is rapidly evolving, demanding a more flexible and responsive system

Mount Redoubt can be seen across Cook Inlet from North Kenai Beach on Thursday, July 2, 2022. (Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion file photo)
Opinion: Hilcorp Alaska: Powering Southcentral Alaska — past, present and future

Hilcorp Alaska has and will continue to fully develop our Cook Inlet basin leasehold

Sen. Jesse Bjorkman, a Nikiski Republican, speaks in favor of overriding a veto of Senate Bill 140 during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024 (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Sen. Jesse Bjorkman: Collegiality matters

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

Juneau Empire file photo
Larry Persily.
Opinion: Alaska might as well embrace the past

The governor, legislators, municipal officials and business leaders are worried that the Railbelt will run short of natural gas before the end of the decade

The Alaska State Capitol on March 1. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Opinion: Physicians oppose Alaska Senate Bill 115 — Independent Practice for PAs

Alaskans don’t want access to just any health care, they want access to high quality care