What others say: Keep the spirit of the ice bucket challenge going

  • Tuesday, September 2, 2014 5:36pm
  • Opinion

The Ice Bucket Challenge has had quite a ride.

Over the course of a summer it has become an internet sensation and raised millions (close to $80 million according to alsa.org) for research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

We are heartened that a country that claims to be as divided as the United States has found a reason to pull together. For that alone, the folks at the ALS Association have earned our gratitude.

Who would have believed that tens of thousands would make videos of themselves as they are hit with a bucket of ice water? It has been marketing genius.

But there is nothing like success to attract critics. Some note that Californians in the middle of a drought can’t afford to waste water. We agree. They shouldn’t. But you don’t have to get wet to donate.

Some disagree for religious reasons with the ALSA’s research. OK. Surely there’s another worthy cause that could use help.

Finally, accept the challenge with care. The ice water will be enough of a rush without adding any dangerous twists, such as dropping the bucket from high above. And if you have a medical condition that could be aggravated by a sudden drop in temperature, hold the ice water and just donate. But most of all, let’s keep this spirit alive.

— Sun Herald, Biloxi, Mississippi,

Aug. 25

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