What others say: Alaska’s Real ID deadline extended

  • By Ketchikan Daily News editorial
  • Tuesday, November 7, 2017 8:52pm
  • Opinion

Alaska — once again — is saved by the bell.

Or, in this case, an extension.

Alaska’s deadline for complying with REAL ID has been extended by the federal government to Oct. 10, 2018. The previous extension expired Oct. 10 of this year.

Congress passed the REAL ID Act in 2005, which enacted the 9/11 Commission’s suggestion that the federal government “set standards for the issuance of sources of identification, such as driver’s licenses.”

This required states to comply with standards designed to better verify identities of applicants for driver’s licenses and identification cards.

If Alaska hadn’t received an extension, Alaskans would have had to use another federally accepted form of identification when traveling or visiting a variety of federal facilities. For example, a passport would have sufficed for airline travel.

While Alaskans may continue to use state-issued driver’s licenses and identification cards for an additional 12 months, the act requires that all states be REAL ID compliant by Oct. 1, 2020.

Alaska is scheduled to be able to provide REAL ID-compliant cards by January 2019. Of course, a passport suffices, and it qualifies as appropriate identification before and after REAL ID takes effect in the state.

The pressure is off Alaskans when it comes to complying with REAL ID — at least for a while.

— Ketchikan Daily News,

Nov. 2

More in Opinion

Sen. Jesse Bjorkman, a Nikiski Republican, speaks during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Sen. Jesse Bjorkman: Protecting workers, honoring the fallen

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

Rep. Justin Ruffridge, a Soldotna Republican who co-chairs the House Education Committee, speaks during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Rep. Justin Ruffridge: Supporting correspondence programs

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

The Alaska State Capitol on March 1. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Opinion: We support all students

In the last month of session, we are committed to working together with our colleagues to pass comprehensive education reform

Rep. Ben Carpenter, a Nikiski Republican, speaks during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Rep. Ben Carpenter: Securing Alaska’s economic future through tax reform

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

(Juneau Empire file photo)
Opinion: Alaska House makes the right decision on constitutionally guaranteed PFD

The proposed amendment would have elevated the PFD to a higher status than any other need in the state

Rep. Justin Ruffridge, a Soldotna Republican who co-chairs the House Education Committee, speaks during floor debate of a joint session of the Alaska State Legislature on Monday, March 18, 2024. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Rep. Justin Ruffridge: Creating a road map to our shared future

Capitol Corner: Legislators report back from Juneau

An array of solar panels stand in the sunlight at Whistle Hill in Soldotna, Alaska, on Sunday, April 7, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Renewable Energy Fund: Key to Alaska’s clean economy transition

AEA will continue to strive to deliver affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy to provide a brighter future for all Alaskans.

Mount Redoubt can be seen acoss Cook Inlet from North Kenai Beach on Thursday, July 2, 2022. (Photo by Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion)
Opinion: An open letter to the HEA board of directors

Renewable energy is a viable option for Alaska

Most Read