U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski speaks during a meet-and-greet Oct. 12, 2022, at Louie’s Douglas Inn in Juneau, Alaska. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski speaks during a meet-and-greet Oct. 12, 2022, at Louie’s Douglas Inn in Juneau, Alaska. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Opinion: Lisa stands up for women at home and nationwide

Women’s issues are Alaskan issues.

  • Wednesday, November 2, 2022 5:40pm
  • Opinion

Women’s issues are Alaskan issues. As women from across the state, we know that a strong commitment to the issues important to us means a real commitment to addressing the issues most pressing in Alaska today. Women make up 49% of Alaska’s workforce, 76% of health care workers, 62% of workers in education, and 22% of workers in the energy sector. Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s commitment to our state’s most significant issues, from energy to Native issues to health care, education, and beyond, reflects the hard work Alaskan women put in every day in our homes, at our jobs, throughout our communities, and across the state. As the state with one of the highest numbers of female business owners in the country, Alaska’s economy and communities depend on women in more ways than one. Sen. Murkowski sees that and has continually fought for small businesses — and for women — throughout her time in the Senate.

Sen. Murkowski has also defined herself as a relentless advocate, particularly when it comes to ending violence against women. She doesn’t shy away from the difficult statistics women face in Alaska, and played a central role in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act earlier this year, ensuring that women in Alaska and across the country are protected under law in cases of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The law provides services, protection, and justice for young survivors and reauthorizes several programs that address violence against women through legal, educational, and economic means. It also improves the medical response in cases of violence against women, particularly in rural communities, and clarifies tribal authority when it comes to violence against women that takes place on tribal lands. With the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, Sen. Murkowski ensured the continuation of efforts to prevent domestic violence and sexual assault, support survivors, and hold perpetrators accountable.

Within the broader issue of violence against women, Sen. Murkowski is passionate about addressing the crisis of missing, murdered, and trafficked Indigenous women. To that end, she was instrumental in the passage of Savanna’s Act and the Not Invisible Act into law. These bipartisan bills address the crisis of missing, murdered, and trafficked Indigenous women by improving the federal government’s response through increased coordination, development of best practices, and creation of a commission on violent crime.

From supporting women entrepreneurs and bolstering our state’s economy to working toward a world where all women can feel safe in their communities, Sen. Murkowski does more than just say she supports women. She shows up, and she does the work, too. She advocates for us, across Alaska and in Washington, D.C., and the support women across the state have shown her in return speaks volumes. We are Alaskan women and we are voting to reelect Lisa Murkowski as our Senator.

Signed,

Debbie Reinwand, President/CEO, Brilliant Media Strategies, Anchorage

Lisa Parker, Councilwoman, Soldotna

Charisse Millett, Anchorage

Gail R. Schubert, Anchorage

Faith Tyson, Social Worker & Policy Analyst, Shishmaref

Tiffany Cook, Ketchikan

Kristina Woolston, Anchorage

Marna Sanford, business owner, Fairbanks

Bonnie L. Jack, Anchorage

Portland Highbaugh, Program Coordinator, Juneau

Margy Johnson, former mayor, Cordova

Marya Pillifant, President Milly Builders LLC, Anchorage

Jahna Lindemuth, Anchorage

Barbara Nagengast, Retired Teacher and Principal, Palmer

Francy Bennett, Anchorage

Kara Moriarty, Anchorage

Rachel Kallander, Kallander & Associates, Anchorage

Patricia Kallander, Kallander Fisheries LLC, Cordova

Cameron Blackwell, college student, Soldotna

Lisa Ilutsik, Dillingham

Gretchen Wieman Fauske, Anchorage

Pat Branson, Mayor, Kodiak

Lynne Curry, President, Communication Works Inc., Anchorage

Liz Qaulluq Cravalho, Kotzebue

Marilyn Romano, Anchorage

Shanda Richards, Director of Revenue Cycle, Kenai

Jennifer Johnston, Anchorage

Claire Oberg, Public School Teacher, Anchorage

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