Keep an open mind on road upgrades

  • Saturday, February 15, 2014 4:43pm
  • Opinion

During a recent public open house, Soldotna City Engineer Kyle Kornelis asked that, when it comes to a proposal to build several traffic roundabouts on Binkley Street, the public give the idea a fair shake.

When the plan was initially shared with the public, there was great deal of concern from the public over how it would affect traffic on Binkley, whether it would help with traffic flow, and even whether changes to the road are needed at all. Some concerns were based on specific issues, some seemed to stem more from fear of the unknown, as there are no roundabouts on the Kenai Peninsula.

However, the city has done its homework on the issue, and at this point has a reasonable answer for most concerns, backed up by traffic impact analyses. Road designers have taken into account all types of traffic, including commercial vehicles and the RVs you see rolling through town. Engineers have made accommodations for bicycles and pedestrians along what is one of Soldotna’s busiest streets, and Central Emergency Services says roundabouts would likely be beneficial to emergency vehicles responding from the station at the Binkley Street-Wilson Lane intersection. Even the process for snow removal has been considered.

The bottom line is that there are many roads around the Kenai Peninsula, including Binkley Street, that handle a much higher volume of traffic than what was envisioned when they were first built decades ago. Upgrading roads is going to take a large investment, as well as some creative problem solving, because in a lot of areas, simply adding more lanes isn’t feasible.

We’re glad to hear that municipal officials and engineers are listening to public concerns as they look for ways to rehabilitate our roads. We hope that those of us who will be traveling on those roads keep an open mind when we see some outside-the-box solutions.

More in Opinion

U.S. Small Business Administration
SBA’s Restaurant Revitalization Fund: Apply now!

The American Rescue Plan Act established the RRF to provide funding to help restaurants and other eligible businesses keep their doors open.

teaser
Opinion: Why is CON Still in Alaska?

CON laws are little more than expensive and time-consuming barriers to care.

McKibben Jackinsky. (Photo courtesy of McKibben Jackinsky)
Point of View: Caregivers Support Group shows others willing to help

Caregiving is a 24-hour job and can be overwhelming at times.

George Bennett pictured shortly after arriving in Vietnam in 1967. Mr. Bennett served in the 2/12th Infantry 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division and was assigned to Dau Tieng Base Camp. (Photo courtesy George Bennett, Sr.)
Opinion: It’s time to correct a Vietnam-era injustice

Let’s give our Alaska Native Vietnam-era veterans the land they’re owed and honor their legacy of service before it’s too late.

Alex Koplin is a founding member of Kenai Peninsula Votes. (courtesy photo)
Voices of the Peninsula: What’s in a number?

The more we promote the importance of voting, the more we improve our civic health.

Former Alaska representative Les Gara, left, and Amanda Metivier, associate director of the Child Welfare Academy. (courtesy)
Fostering more important than ever

We have fewer foster homes today than we did before COVID.

teaser
Reports show value of UA workforce development programs

The economic value of training and education is abundantly clear

The MV Matanuska awaits repairs at the Auke Bay Ferry Terminal on Thursday as lawmakers at the state Capitol debated whether the Alaska Marine Highway System was actually a highway. A bill that would shape long-term planning for the system passed out of committee. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Opinion: The feigning champions of the ferry system

Token improvements aren’t anything to brag about.

Most Read