Editorial: New Year’s greatest hits

  • By Peninsula Clarion Editorial
  • Sunday, December 31, 2017 10:49am
  • Opinion

In looking for inspiration for 2018, we found ourselves flipping through some of the editorials we’ve written from New Year’s past. Much like New Year’s resolutions, we found a few common threads running throughout our New Year’s editorials. Here a few snippets, most of which are just as applicable in 2018 as they were a decade ago:

Perhaps we should borrow the Boy Scouts’ motto when we talk about 2007. From a wildfire in the Caribou Hills to a borough election with contradictory results, there was much over the past year for which we on the Kenai Peninsula needed to be prepared. …

While the end of the year is a good time for reflection, it’s also a good time to look ahead. Let’s take some time to prepare for the challenges we will face in the new year so we’re not surprised by the things we should have seen coming.

— Dec. 30, 2007

It’s been an interesting year on the Kenai Peninsula as we’ve faced crises both natural and man-made.

A wicked cold snap to start the year, the eruption of Mount Redoubt and a wildfire caused by a lightning strike, drew plenty of concern over the course of the year.

Meanwhile, our local governing bodies took actions that inspired more citizen involvement than we’ve seen in a number of years. …

The best advice we can give is something we harped on throughout 2009: Whatever the potential crisis may be, be prepared. Fire, flood, cold, earthquake, volcano — make sure you’re prepared an emergency kit and can get by for a few days.

Likewise, be prepared for whatever happens with the economy. Reduce your debt, put some money in savings and stick to your budget.

And when it comes to our government, the same advice applies. Keep an eye on what the assembly, city councils and service area boards are up to. If something just isn’t right, don’t wait for someone else to fix it. Taking action and making your voice heard is in everybody’s best interest.

— Jan. 3, 2010

2010 was an interesting year, to say the least.

In many ways, it may seem like we’re right back where we started.

We may or may not be closer to construction of a natural gas pipeline to the Lower 48. Other ideas for bringing gas from the Slope to Southcentral Alaska continue to be discussed, though the only gas yet to be shipped still seems to be Ethan Berkowitz’s little tank of propane. …

The more things change, the more they stay the same, right?

— Jan. 2, 2011

In a recent poll question, the Clarion asked readers if they were looking forward to the new year. Results were mixed, with about half voting that they see positive things happening for themselves or their community, and half predicting the coming year will be a tough one. …

We’d like to offer a few new resolutions you can accomplish this year that will not only make a difference personally, but also in the community. Who knows, a service-oriented resolution could change your year from “challenging” to “positive” or do the same for some one else. …

If you find yourself constantly saying, ‘I just wish somebody would …’ then you’ve got your opportunity.

Take it.

— Dec. 30, 2012

With the New Year just a few days away, many of us are contemplating resolutions. Setting goals in your personal and professional life are important, and we hope you’re able to stick with them. But we’d also like to encourage civic-mindedness in 2015, and with that in mind, here are some other things we encourage Kenai Peninsula residents to resolve:

— Vote …

— Attend a public meeting. Or several …

— Submit public comment …

— Last, but certainly not least, volunteer …

— Dec. 28, 2014

Here’s wishing all of our readers a safe, prosperous 2018.

n n n

The Peninsula Clarion will not publish on Monday and the office will be closed so that employees may spend the New Year’s holiday with friends and family. The Clarion office will reopen Tuesday at 8 a.m. Monday’s comics and puzzles are published in today’s Clarion.

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