Courtesy, patience go a long way on Peninsula roads

  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 8:45pm
  • Opinion

Winter’s grip is receding around the central Kenai Peninsula, which means it’s time for that other season we have here in Alaska — construction.

For Peninsula drivers, that means it’s time to take a deep breath, because it very well might take a few extra minutes to get where you’re going from now until things freeze up again next fall.

There are a number of road projects slated for this summer across the Kenai Peninsula — some already under way. Remember to use caution in construction zones and follow flaggers’ directions. They are there for a reason — to keep drivers and construction workers safe.

For up to date information about road conditions and construction delays, check 511.alaska.gov before heading out.

While we’re on the topic of roads, now is a good time for a reminder that we’re about to start sharing our roads with a whole lot more users.

In addition to the visitors who will start flocking to the Peninsula in the coming weeks, there are plenty of other people getting out on what are quickly becoming ice-free roads. Motorcyclists who have been itching for a ride are revving up their machines. Bicycling continues to grow in popularity, both as a mode of transportation for the daily commute and as a way to get some exercise. Runners and walkers are emerging from winter hibernation, and many will have kids or pets in tow.

Indeed, summer driving on Peninsula roads requires just as much caution and attention as winter driving, if not more so.

We wish safe travels to everyone this spring and summer. Whether you’re traveling by motor vehicle or human power, learn and follow the rules of the road. Remember, a little courtesy and patience go a long way in making sure everybody gets where they’re going.

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