Avoid a nightmare – be safe this weekend

  • Thursday, October 30, 2014 9:42pm
  • Opinion

Peninsula residents beware: Ghosts and goblins will be in out abundance this evening.

In their mad rush to get as much trick-or-treat booty as possible, many children aren’t as aware of traffic as they should be during Halloween. Running from house to house, they often fail to look both directions while crossing the street — a situation that’s rife with danger.

Before kids go out, it’s up to parents to remind them how important it is to be mindful of traffic and obey basic safety rules. Kids need to know that just because they’re free to run about the neighborhood after dark, they shouldn’t forget that motor vehicles have the right of way, and that cars and trucks rule the road.

But because children are notorious for their single-minded pursuit of candy, drivers should bear the brunt of responsibility for keeping the streets safe this Halloween.

That means driving extra slowly and staying aware that costume-clad youngsters can come darting out into the roadway at any time. There’s no reason to hurry through residential neighborhoods to begin with, but Friday night motorists need to be especially vigilant.

Here’s a few more ideas for ways kids can stay safe this Halloween:

■ Go trick-or-treating with a parent, guardian or a grown-up that’s been approved by your parents.

■ Wear reflective clothing.

■ Wear warm boots and warm clothing. It is usually cold this time of year.

■ Watch out for cars. They may not be able to see you very clearly.

■ Walk on the sidewalk, unless there isn’t one. If not, walk on the side of the roadway.

■ Always carry a flashlight or reflective chemical light.

■ Don’t go inside a stranger’s home.

■ Don’t walk across people’s yards. Use their pathway or walkway.

■ Don’t run. Running is a dangerous thing on Halloween night because costumes don’t always fit right and you may trip and fall.

■ If you are wearing a face mask, be especially careful. Masks can make it difficult to see and hear.

■ Walk in groups of people for personal safety.

■ Don’t accept unwrapped candy or baked goods.

■ Have your parents look at your candy before you eat any of it.

Halloween falling on a Friday also means plenty of parties for grown-up goblins, too. For those who choose drink at those gatherings, please, be responsible. Designate a driver, call a cab, or stay the night. Let’s make sure the scares are all in good fun, and not a real-life nightmare.

Halloween is fun and exciting time for kids and adults. By following a few basic safety rules, our community can ensure that this year’s event is a screaming success for all involved.

Have a safe and happy Halloween.

More in Opinion

Homer Foundation
Point of View: Reflections on the Russia I know

My heart goes out to the people of both countries.

Anette Coggins poses for a photo in the Kigluaik Mountains north of Nome, Alaska. (Photo provided)
Point of View: The boldness of honesty

The phrase: “Family and friends smell like fish after three days” is not far from true

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, speaks during an interview at the Juneau Empire on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
Honoring the fallen — and caring for veterans

Alaska has lost servicemembers in conflicts ranging from the Battle of Attu to the Global War on Terror

File
Opinion: The dangerous combination of guns and conspiracies

The hatred that’s crept its way into American politics is new. The violence it’s spawned is newer yet.

Jodi Taylor is the board chair for Alaska Policy Forum. (Courtesy photo)
Private school, state reimbursement: family choice

By Jodi Taylor Alaskan parents have a legitimate right to choose the… Continue reading

t
Opinion: It’s time for bold action to protect our fisheries

Our fisheries feed the world and sustain our unique cultures and communities.

The logo for the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is displayed inside the George A. Navarre Borough Admin Building on Thursday, July 22, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Voices of the Peninsula: Hard to fill positions?

Paying poverty wages to support staff, secretaries and custodians is unacceptable yet routine behavior by our district

A copy of the State of Alaska Official Ballot for the June 11, 2022, Special Primary Election is photographed on May 2, 2022. (Peninsula Clarion staff)
Choosing a candidate – Who will best represent us in D.C.?

Voters are encouraged to do homework before casting a vote

Tourists watch as one of two cubs belonging to an 18-year-old sow black bear crosses the path between groups of tourists visiting the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Opinion: Tourists have pushed us to critical mass in parts of Juneau

I don’t go to the glacier in the summer now to hike or watch bears.

Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships. (logo provided)
Point of View: A few ideas for Mental Health Awareness Month

What are some things you can practice this month and subsequently apply to your life?

Sens. Shelley Hughes, R-Palmer, left, and Robert Myers, R-North Pole, read through one of 41 amendments submitted to the state’s omnibus budget bill being debate on the floor of the Alaska State Senate on Monday, May 9, 2022. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Opinion: The Alaska Senate’s foolish gamble

“All these conservative people just spent all our money”