Alaska Voices: Thugs and leaders in Juneau

Alaska Voices: Thugs and leaders in Juneau

Thugs steal our future, while leaders see hope and opportunities and take steps in that direction.

  • By Carol Carman
  • Tuesday, July 30, 2019 9:08pm
  • Opinion

Real leaders herd cats and finish the job in 90 days. Cats will hiss at not getting all they want, but sessions will be finished with integrity. No one will be able to honestly complain that the leader pulled shenanigans, because all rules were followed.

Thugs rule the Legislature with shenanigans and by force. Thugs don’t follow required House Rules during floor sessions. Thugs mute opposing views by adjourning floor sessions without giving them opportunity to speak. Sometimes, when a thug is outnumbered, he recesses and sneaks back secretly with an accomplice to officially adjourn. Not telling those who oppose about the meeting mutes them, because they could have overridden the adjournment.

Thugs call in legal advisors to manipulate laws to suit their agenda. Leaders call them out when legal advisors say, “you don’t have to follow laws.” Thugs applaud the constitution being perverted, creating an illusion of statutory conflict. They use the illusion to bash legislators and the governor. Leaders see how the constitution and law work together and follow both.

Thugs ignore laws when a governor calls special sessions in Wasilla, because they can’t face people who tell them truth. Thugs pervert the constitution to cover their own lawlessness. Leaders go to Wasilla, where the law tells them and stay there until directed lawfully to go somewhere else, even when they don’t want to be with thugs in Juneau. A leader allows legislators to work things out themselves, but brings them together when necessary. Then he steps back and gives them room to resolve issues, patiently offering to negotiate.

Thugs don’t negotiate. Not in 90 days, 120 days, in a special session, or in a second special session. Thugs are determined to get their way at any cost, even bankrupting the state — while trying to convince everyone it’s the right thing to do. A leader sees danger in overspending and makes firm decisions to protect people from long-term consequences, even if it is painful at first. Leaders continually offer the hand of negotiation.

Thugs have favorites. You know when you are one, because thugs will steal from every man, woman, and child in the state and give their money to you. Thugs call people’s requests that laws be obeyed, selfish. Leaders insist on following the law, and denounce stealing from people.

A thug promises not to steal the PFD from people, and call it theft when running for office. After getting elected they steal from those same people (hoping they won’t notice or will forget).

Thugs kick leaders out of committees when they vote their constituents’ wishes rather than the wishes of thugs. Leaders allow legislators to represent their home districts.

Thugs steal our future, while leaders see hope and opportunities and take steps in that direction, even under persecution from thugs, from thugs’ favorites, and a complicit media.

Thugs rule the Legislature with shenanigans and force. Thank God for Gov. Dunleavy and faithful House Republicans!

Carol Carman is a political activist, ARP District 9 Chair, Alaskan since 1954, and fed up with thugs.


• By Carol Carman. Opinion articles and Letters to the Editor represent the view of the author, not the view of the Peninsula Clarion.


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