Why did the Waterworks rubber ducky cross the road?

Why did the Waterworks rubber ducky cross the road?

To soak it up on the other side at the new Waterworks location of course! For years the Peninsula’s largest rubber ducky has been located at the “Y” in Soldotna heralding “Alaska’s Hot Water Experts” location next to Chez Moi Boutique. Now the giant tub toy has crossed the street where there is much more display space for their wide variety of spas, saunas and massage chairs. According to Wellness Dutchess Cheryl Lindsley, “The Waterworks since 1976 has been specializing in connecting Alaskans with Hot Tubs, Traditional & Infra-Red Saunas, & more recently luxury massage chairs by Infinity. I’ve heard people say ‘Oh! We have a massage chair at home.’ Then they try out the Infinity, experience zero gravity and will say, ‘But not like this, this is the difference between having a car and having a Cadillac,” she said in an interview from the new location, “we don’t just want people to purchase our products—we want them to discover all the benefits of being part of the Hot Spring Spas family. Everything we do is based on creating an ownership experience that is unmatched in Alaska.”

The Waterworks is Alaska’s authorized Hot Springs, Caldara, & Free Flow Hot Tub Dealership. The Waterworks has been serving Alaska from its locations in Anchorage, Eagle River, & Soldotna. The Waterworks is also an authorized dealer of Finnleo Saunas. It all started back in the ‘70’s according to second generation owner Kali Bennett, “Ever since people got word that Tim had made himself a Redwood Hot Tub back in the 70’s, they started asking him to build one for them. So that’s when Tim & his lovely wife Linda decided this was a great idea for a business. It wasn’t until the 80’s that Tim & Linda found a portable hot tub that was worthy of Alaskans, so that’s when they introduced Hot Springs Spas to the market.

In the time since that first Redwood Tub until now, The Waterworks has become known as Alaska’s Hot Water Experts and our new motto of “Wellness For Life” fits well with all our new product lines. With our larger location in Soldotna we are now able to showcase a wider variety of hot tubs, saunas, & massage chairs to better serve the Kenai Peninsula while maintaining our special bond with Alaskans that goes all the way back to the 70’s,” stated Bennett in a news release.

Stop by The Waterworks new location and speak with the Wellness Dutchess herself anytime Tuesday – Friday 10:00am – 6:00pm and check out their booth at the upcoming Home Show and at Sport Rec & Trade Show, “And we’ll also have our famous tent sale going on the same weekend May 2nd through May 10th with extra special re-grand opening deals going on to help you enjoy wellness for life,” said Lindsley.

Why did the Waterworks rubber ducky cross the road?

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