A quilt entitled, “Royal Horse”, by Betty Ames hangs on the wall Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at the Kenai Fine Arts Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

A quilt entitled, “Royal Horse”, by Betty Ames hangs on the wall Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at the Kenai Fine Arts Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

‘This is their expression’

September art auction exhibit showcases local talent

A longtime tradition returns this month to the Kenai Fine Art Center, which is showcasing its September exhibit, the annual Harvest Art Auction.

The monthlong exhibit spotlights many of the central peninsula’s finest artists and their work, which will be parting ways with its owners for a good cause. The event goes back over a dozen years and is a fundraiser to support the Old Town gallery.

The show flaunts around 30 art pieces from over 20 different artists, including everything from quilted designs, pottery, paper art, photography, painting, metal art and encaustic design.

Shannon Olds, member of the Fine Art Center and Potter’s Guild boards, said the fundraising event has played a big role in fueling the gallery’s passion and bottom line for years.

“It’s been ongoing,” Olds said. “We fundraise every year to make sure we pay the bills and have our receptions for the artists.”

“They keep the doors open and the lights on,” added Marion Nelson, longtime member and vice president of the Fine Art Center.

The traditional auction itself will be Sept. 28 at 6 p.m., but the art silent auction will begin today at 5 p.m. with an opening reception that will feature gourmet appetizers, music and a drawing for door prizes.

Nelson said the event will also allow select art pieces to be purchased at their listed value and the interested members to immediately own the art. Any pieces secured at face value will still be displayed in the gallery for the month of September.

Olds said the creativity and passion shown by artists from the central peninsula provide a window into their minds and ideas.

“If you just think about the artists, this is their expression, this is how they are creative in life,” Olds said. “Some people have creative energy that they release in different ways. I release mine with clay. Some people might release theirs in painting or fiber art.”

Olds entered two pieces of pottery into the show as well, both low-fired pieces made with all organic and inorganic materials, things such as copper and sugar. Olds said she creates objects with a low-fire kiln that heats up to 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. Olds said she has dabbled in pottery consistently since 2011, when she began teaching herself the art of the craft.

Soldotna artist and Fine Art Center board member Rachel Grossl also has two pieces entered, including a practical entry in papier-mache shoes. Grossl said 2019 is the first year she’s entered something in the Harvest Art Auction, but her experience working with quilting and fiber arts goes back much farther.

“Pinterest is where I get my inspiration from,” Grossl said with a smile. “But I’ve done it my whole life.”

The gallery is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m., giving the community the chance to check in on the silent auction fares.

A pair of papier-mache shoes created by Rachel Grossl sit Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at the Kenai Fine Arts Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

A pair of papier-mache shoes created by Rachel Grossl sit Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at the Kenai Fine Arts Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Joey Klecka/Peninsula Clarion)

More in News

Kenai City Hall on Feb. 20, 2020, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Grocery incentive program goes live Monday in Kenai

The program aims to help people double the money they are able to spend on groceries and household goods

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks at an Anchorage news conference on Dec. 11, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)
Governor tests positive for virus

Dunleavy had been in quarantine since learning Sunday.

This undated map shows three wildlife enhancement projects on the southern Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, planned or done by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. (Map courtesy of Alaska Department of Fish and Game)
3 projects on southern Kenai Peninsula aim to benefit moose habitat

Cut willow bushes will regenerate into higher protein browse for moose

State health officials address members of the media during a virtual press conference on Wednesday, Feb. 24 in Alaska. (Screenshot)
State to receive over 100,000 doses for March

The 103,120 figure is comparable to the allocations Alaska received for December, January and February combined.

Kenai River Brown Bears defenseman Shayne Monahan controls the puck early in the third period as 1,113 fans watch Friday, March 24, 2017, at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex. (Photo by Jeff Helminiak/Peninsula Clarion)
Brown Bears to return after council loosens sports center mitigation

The resolution increases the number of spectators allowed at events to 750

This undated photo shows a section of Deep Creek near Ninilchik, Alalska recently acquired by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game with the assistance of the Kachemak Heritage Land Trust to protect hunting and fishing in the area. (Photo courtesy of Kachemak Heritage Land Trust)
State, feds and land trust work together to acquire 93.5 acres for conservation

Oil spill trust fund used to buy fish habitat on valuable salmon stream

Mile 93 of the Sterling Highway (511.Alaska.gov)
Sterling Highway reopens following accident

The road reopened Wednesday evening

Ryanna Thurman uses a holds locker at the Soldotna Public Library on Friday, Jan. 15 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna departments reflect on COVID response

Library, parks and rec, emergency services and IT gave feedback on 2020 performance.

Air-source heat pumps, like the one in this 2015 photo of Jake Eames, right, and David Nash installing a pump, are an example of a load-side technology that can increase energy efficiency. "Load-side technologies are absolutely key to our ability to reduce greenhouse emissions in the energy sector,” said director of energy services at Alaska Electric Light and Power Alec Mesdag.
In Juneau, going green focuses on power usage

The electricity’s already clean.

Most Read