Teacher firearms training to be offered during nationwide event

Teacher firearms training to be offered during nationwide event

No Alaska teachers have signed up for the free training

As part of National Train a Teacher Day, on Saturday educators from across the country will receive free training on how to shoot and handle a firearm.

In Alaska, the free training is offered by a sole business in Palmer, Point Blank Firearms and Self Defense Training. However, Point Blank owner, Donna Anthony, said no Alaska teachers have signed up for the free training. During last year’s Train a Teacher Day, she offered the free training to eight educators.

This is the second year of the event, which is sponsored by the United States Concealed Carry Association and TASER. The event’s website said the idea behind the day is “to work together to empower the people that educate our children.”

The event is taking place in 42 states.

Anthony has worked in law enforcement in Alaska for over 20 years. She said Alaska’s rural schools can be vulnerable to active shooters, but they don’t have to be.

“Alaska is unique,” she said. “We have cities and we also have very rural areas. In more remote areas, law enforcement won’t get to (schools). Give employees a plan to better protect our schools.”

She said that plan doesn’t necessarily entail arming every teacher. She says she’s supportive of trying to provide tools for teachers.

The eight teachers trained by Anthony told her they were frustrated with current policies and procedures, hoping for more training and improved legislation, when it came to safeguarding their classrooms, Anthony said. She said she’d also like to see better legislation in Alaska.

Anthony said several states have adopted legislation that elects specific teachers or staff to act as a “school marshal.” The teacher or staff member would be offered training and be permitted to carry a gun on campus. In February of last year, Kentucky passed a similar bill.

“It’s similar to a U.S. Marshal program, where one volunteer takes the position of carrying and no one knows about it, but the principal and district,” Anthony said.

The teacher or staff member would be a volunteer.

“No one is pushed into something they’re not comfortable with,” she said.

Anthony said Point Blank is looking to expand their scope and provide those tools to teachers across the state, not just in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough.

Anthony said educators, or anyone in the public who interested, can access Point Blank’s online training, which focuses on training and handling an active shooter in the workplace.

More in News

Vice President Tyson Cox speaks during a meeting of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly in Soldotna, Alaska, on Tuesday, June 4, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Assembly to discuss short-term rental tax on Tuesday

The resolution describes a proposed tax of up to 12%

Photo provided by Special Olympics Alaska Central Peninsula
The Special Olympics Alaska Central Peninsula team stands together for a photo during the Summer State Games in Anchorage.
Area athletes claim 45 medals at Special Olympics Alaska Summer Games

The Central Peninsula team fielded 17 local athletes in the competition

tease
Homer, Seldovia to celebrate summer solstice

Events will be held starting June 20

A freshly stocked rainbow trout swims in Johnson Lake during Salmon Celebration on Wednesday, May 10, 2023, at Johnson Lake in Kasilof, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Slow sockeye fishing at Russian River, good rainbow trout at Kenai Lake

A Northern Kenai Fishing Report published by the State Department of Fish… Continue reading

Council member James Baisden speaks in favor of an amendment to the City of Kenai’s budget that would add funds for construction of a veteran’s memorial column in the Kenai Cemetery during a meeting of the Kenai City Council in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, June 5, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai budget amendment allocates funds for veterans’ columbarium in cemetery expansion

A columbarium is an aboveground structure that houses cremated remains

Council member Alex Douthit speaks in favor of an amendment to the CIty of Kenai’s budget that would reduce funds allocated to the Storefront and Streetscape Improvement Program during a meeting of the Kenai City Council in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, June 5, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Funding reduced for City of Kenai’s storefront improvement grant program

Just over a year after the City of Kenai established its Storefront… Continue reading

Mount Redoubt can be seen across Cook Inlet from North Kenai Beach on Thursday, July 2, 2022. (Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion file photo)
Hilcorp only bidder in Cook Inlet oil and gas lease sale

8 million acres were available for bidding in the sale, spread across Cook Inlet and the Alaska Peninsula region

Council member Phil Daniel speaks during a meeting of the Kenai City Council in Kenai, Alaska, on Wednesday, June 5, 2024. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
City of Kenai approves budget

A draft of the document says that the city expects to bring in around $19.5 million in the next year, and spend $20.2 million

A sockeye salmon rests atop a cooler at the mouth of the Kasilof River on Monday, June 26, 2023, in Kasilof, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
A sockeye salmon rests atop a cooler at the mouth of the Kasilof River on Monday, June 26, 2023, in Kasilof, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Kasilof River personal use setnet opening delayed

Low counts for Kenai River early-run king salmon motivate restriction

Most Read