Sterling man faces sexual abuse, child porn charges

A Sterling man has been accused of sexually abusing two minors over the course of several years and involving them in the creation of child pornography.

Bradley Elliott, 55, was arraigned at the Kenai Courthouse Thursday on 34 charges ranging from sexual abuse of a minor in the second degree to unlawful exploitation of a minor, indecent exposure and charges related to child pornography, according to online court documents. Additional charges are pending, according to the documents.

Elliott was arrested after the Alaska State Troopers Alaska Bureau of Investigation, Soldotna patrol troopers and members of the Statewide Drug Enforcement Unit and Anchorage Police Department served a search warrant at his home in Sterling on Wednesday, according to an online trooper dispatch.

Elliott is alleged to have started sexually abusing a boy and his brother dating back to 2002, according to the complaints filed against him and an affidavit written by Alaska State Trooper Austin MacDonald with the Alaska Bureau of Investigations. Elliott is accused of sexually abusing the brothers during hunting trips he took them on and creating pornographic videos of them, soliciting them to film themselves having sex with others, viewing child porn, and distributing it. The sexual abuse began around the time one brother was 11 years old, and when the other boy was in about fifth grade, according to the affidavit.

Elliott coached the Soldotna High School junior varsity hockey team from 2008 to 2010 and was an assistant coach for the varsity team in the 2007-08 season, according to a 2012-13 Soldotna High School Hockey program.

An investigation began when one of the two brothers approached troopers at the Soldotna post last December and reported that Elliott “is a child molester.”

He and his brother gave accounts of being sexually abused on hunting trips, at Elliott’s cabin in Seward and in his homes — he lived in Kenai before Sterling — during interviews stretching from December 2015 to July 10, 2016, according to the affidavit.

Elliott took pornographic videos of the brothers, according to the affidavit. According to the brothers’ interviews, he “forgave” one brother money off of his rent, and gave the other steroids in return for making the videos.

Elliott faces one count of misconduct involving a controlled substance in the fourth degree, according to a complaint document.

The videos were shot with older video cameras and then a GoPro, according to the affidavit.

“This happened all the way up until I was 18,” one brother told troopers, according to the affidavit. “I would estimate he filmed around 35 or 40 videos of me that he sold to the Russian website.”

The same brother also told troopers Elliott had made a few “fetish” videos of him, including one in which Elliott urinated on the boy, according to the affidavit. Other videos consisted of Elliott holding a Glock pistol to the boy’s head, saying things like “I’m going to kill you,” and pretending to rape the boy, according to the affidavit.

Elliott also filmed himself having sex with the brother who first made a report to troopers along with girls who were the boy’s girlfriends at the time, and encouraged the boy to film himself having sex with his girlfriends in exchange for money taken off his rent, according to the affidavit.

“I try not to keep them,” Elliott said of the videos to one of the brothers during a recorded conversation set up by troopers in June, according to the affidavit. “It seems stupid to me from all the reading and research I’ve done. They guys who get caught are the people who keep the (stuff).”

When troopers showed up to serve the search warrant at Elliott’s Sterling home on Wednesday, they found a laptop on his bed that was playing “commercially produced pornography depicting two young-looking males having sexual intercourse,” according to the affidavit.

Troopers found the Glock pistol and other props mentioned by the brothers, including face masks, zip ties, handcuffs attached to a rope and a “long folding knife,” as well as suspected steroids and hypodermic needles, according to the affidavit.

MacDonald wrote in the affidavit that computer devices and electronic storage media found in Elliott’s home were sent to the Technical Crimes Unit for examination, which Alaska State Troopers Public Information Officer Megan Peters said is a branch of the Alaska Bureau of Investigations.

Elliott declined to say anything about the case when asked for an interview, according to the affidavit.

Online court documents show Elliot’s next court date is a preliminary hearing set for July 22.

Jeff Helminiak contributed to this story. Reach Megan Pacer at megan.pacer@peninsulaclarion.com.

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