Soldotna Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Shanon Davis (courtesy)

Soldotna Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Shanon Davis (courtesy)

Soldotna chamber, shop local program get praise from city

The program resulted in an overall economic impact of around $876,750, chamber says

Soldotna’s winter shop local program had an economic impact of more than $850,000, according to the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center’s Fall 2020 quarterly report.

The program, called the “Holding Our Own” shop local program, was offered by the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center in partnership with the City of Soldotna.

The program, which ran from Nov. 16 to Dec. 16, aimed to incentivize shopping at Soldotna businesses by awarding people who spent $200 on discretionary purchases at participating businesses $100 in coupons to spend at those same businesses.

According to the report, $289,250 was paid out to the 58 businesses who participated in the program and 2,893 shoppers received vouchers, resulting in an overall economic impact of around $876,750. Of the shoppers who participated, 766 had addresses outside of Soldotna city limits and 13 had addresses outside of the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

“Many people told us that this program convinced them to shop in Soldotna rather than online,” the report said. “We also heard from many, many people who live in other communities that they came to Soldotna to shop specifically because of the program.”

During her presentation to the council, Soldotna Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Shanon Davis called the program the highlight of her chamber career. Several members of the council praised Davis and the chamber for their work, especially over the last quarter.

“You guys are a huge promoter for the City of Soldotna,” said council member Dave Carey. “We owe you guys a huge amount and I know we work mutually in many ways. There are places where the chamber and the city are not friends, but you guys are great friends to us and hopefully we are the same to you.”

Reach reporter Ashlyn O’Hara at ashlyn.ohara@peninsulaclarion.com.

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