The Arness Septage Site in Nikiski, shown here from the air in September 1985. The site was contaminated with thousands of gallons of oil and other industry wastes. Concerns about the septage site and a new monofill waste site in the area prompted the Kenai Peninsula Borough to commission a groundwater movement study. The results will be presented at a March 23 meeting in Nikiski.

The Arness Septage Site in Nikiski, shown here from the air in September 1985. The site was contaminated with thousands of gallons of oil and other industry wastes. Concerns about the septage site and a new monofill waste site in the area prompted the Kenai Peninsula Borough to commission a groundwater movement study. The results will be presented at a March 23 meeting in Nikiski.

Results of Nikiski groundwater study to be released

  • By Rashah McChesney
  • Monday, March 9, 2015 12:06pm
  • News

A series of underground maps designed to give researchers a picture of groundwater depth and flow direction in central Nikiski have been completed.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough contracted with a private firm for the groundwater modeling study which surveyed well locations, static water levels and more than 60 wells in the area of land between the McGahan Industrial Park, the AIMM Monofill site, the Cook Inlet and the east property line of Nikiski High School.

Researchers will present their findings during a March 23 meeting at 50810 Island Lake Road in Nikiski.

The borough signed a $119,970 contract with Anchorage-based DOWL HKM to perform the study after the state awarded $150,000 for the venture in a capital budget reappropriation in 2013.

Community discussion over potential groundwater contaminants in the area was rekindled when Texas-based AIMM Technologies proposed, and ultimately built, a waste disposal site on a 1.5 acre plot that will store up to 10 million gallons of petroleum waste at the end of Halliburton Drive.

During the 15-month process of getting the project permitted, residents in the area said they were concerned that the site would join, or affect a neighboring piece of land known as the Arness Septage site.

At the septage site, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation officials have said that at least 4,200 gallons of oil-contaminated waste, sludge and other pollutants were improperly stored.

No one knows the extent of the pollution or how much of it got into the groundwater.

The Arness Septage site was included in the survey. In addition, data from six wells built by AIMM Technologies was to be included in the model. However, project planners stressed that they would not be testing for pollutants.

“This study is not to show whether there is contamination in the area,” said DOWL HKM Public Involvement Manager Rachel Steer during a November 2014 Nikiski community meeting.

“This study could be used in the future to determine where contaminants have traveled, but this is the first step that you need to do to be able to do anything else.”

 

Reach Rashah McChesney at Rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com

More in News

Alaska State Troopers logo.
Fatal collision near Anchor Point closes highway for hours

Troopers received a call about the collision shortly after noon

Members of the Soldotna Elks Lodge #2706, including Exalted Ruler Robert Dixon and Secretary Shannon Woodford (third and fifth from the left) stand with purchased toys and clothes for donation to local children at the lodge in Soldotna, Alaska, on Friday, Dec. 2, 2022. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna Elks to donate toys and clothes to local kids

Yearlong fundraiser brings in more than $13,000

Portions of the Kenai bluff can be seen eroding below Old Town Kenai in this undated photo. (Photo by Aidan Curtin/courtesy Scott Curtin)
Portions of the Kenai bluff can be seen eroding below Old Town Kenai in this undated photo. (Photo by Aidan Curtin/courtesy Scott Curtin)
Infrastructure dollars flood peninsula

Federal infrastructure bill makes available more than $232M for peninsula projects

Soldotna City Hall is seen on Wednesday, June 23, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna bumps vote on use of accessory housing as short-term rentals

An accessory dwelling unit is a subordinate, detached dwelling unit located on a lot or parcel with an existing residence

Foliage surrounds the Soldotna Police Department sign on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Foliage surrounds the Soldotna Police Department sign on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2022, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Law enforcement to host women’s self-defense class in January

Within 48 hours of the course being advertised, 120 women had signed up to participate

Alaska State Troopers logo.
Local hunter credits community members for Thanksgiving rescue

Glover said he didn’t even strike out from his home to go hunting

In this July 13, 2007, photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. (AP Photo / Al Grillo)
EPA proposes restrictions to block Pebble Mine

Mine developer Pebble Limited Partnershi called the EPA’s decision a preemptive veto

Architect Nancy Casey speaks in front of a small gathering at this year’s final Fireside Chat presented by the Kenai Watershed Forum on Nov. 30, 2022, at Kenai River Brewing in Soldotna, Alaska. (Jake Dye/Peninsula Clarion)
Building with the environment in mind

Kenai Watershed Forum’s Fireside Chats conclude

Johni Blankenship signs her name after being sworn in as Soldotna City Clerk at a city council meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Blankenship sworn in as Soldotna city clerk

Blankenship comes to the City of Soldotna from the Kenai Peninsula Borough

Most Read