Courtesy Photo / Juneau Raptor Center
Volunteers from the Juneau Raptor Center cared for this eaglet, who was found on the ground near Angoon and named Pearl. Local volunteers rescued the raptor and Alaska Seaplanes transported him to Juneau where volunteers fed him, administered fluids, and created a kennel with shredded paper to increase his comfort. Pearl is now at the Alaska Raptor Center in Sitka.

Courtesy Photo / Juneau Raptor Center Volunteers from the Juneau Raptor Center cared for this eaglet, who was found on the ground near Angoon and named Pearl. Local volunteers rescued the raptor and Alaska Seaplanes transported him to Juneau where volunteers fed him, administered fluids, and created a kennel with shredded paper to increase his comfort. Pearl is now at the Alaska Raptor Center in Sitka.

Putting ‘Fourth’ effort: It was a busy holiday weekend for Juneau Raptor Center

It was a busy holiday weekend for Juneau Raptor Center

The bald eagle may symbolize America, but for a group of local volunteers who rescue the raptors when they are sick or injured, it’s more personal.

While many people in Juneau were busy celebrating the Fourth of July holiday, volunteers at the Juneau Raptor Center were out rescuing birds — including an eagle, a baby duckling, a robin, and a juvenile sapsucker — work the group has been doing since 1987.

“Our Fourth of July was very busy,” said Kathy Benner, manager of the Juneau Raptor Center in a phone interview on Monday. “Our volunteers do wonderful work and sacrifice a lot to help the birds.”

On Sunday, July 4, she said, hikers called in a downed eagle on a dirt road near Western Auto in the Lemon Creek area. Volunteers dispatched to the site found the eagle had suffered a compound fracture to his left wing. The eagle was euthanized because of the extent of his injuries, Benner said.

Bald eagle rescued on Fourth of July

However, many rescues have happier endings.

On June 27, people found an eaglet weighing only about a pound and half on the ground near Angoon. Local volunteers rescued the raptor, and Alaska Seaplanes transported him to Juneau. Volunteers fed him, administered fluids and created a kennel with shredded paper to increase his comfort.

“He’s doing great,” Benner said, adding that the eaglet was named Pearl and is now at the Alaska Raptor Center in Sitka.

She said that local birds and raptors face several challenges, including being struck by cars, territorial disputes with other eagles and suffering injuries from airplane turbulence.

“It’s unusual to know what happened to the bird,” Benner said.

Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

A busy year

The group has rescued 29 eagles and 72 other birds so far this year.

“It’s a little bit over normal. But not by much. It’s not unprecedented. But, it’s busy,” Benner said, noting that the group rescues 150-200 birds some years. She said that better weather brings more people outside and that helps the group find birds in need of assistance.

PHOTOS: Juneau celebrates the Fourth of July

Benner said that the Juneau Raptor Center is currently looking for donations. She said the group, which is a nonprofit organization, typically receives donations from cruise ship passengers who encounter Lady Baltimore, the eagle kept at the tram station atop Mount Roberts. However, the construction of a wildlife structure for her and the COVID-19-induced pause on cruising has meant two seasons without that source of income.

Benner said the group is selling merchandise again at the Mount Roberts gift shop, but Lady Baltimore won’t return this year due to a limited cruise season.

The Juneau Raptor Center accepts donations through the group’s website at juneauraptorcenter.org and that an online gift shop is also available.

Found a bird in distress?

If you find a bird in distress, contact the Juneau Raptor Center emergency hotline at 907-790-5424. Volunteers monitor the line 24 hours a day.

Contact Dana Zigmund at dana.zigmund@juneauempire.com or 907-308-4891.

More in News

A cruise ship is docked in Seward, Alaska, on Wednesday, May 25, 2022. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
Cruise passengers encouraged to test before docking in Seward

The request comes as new COVID cases are increasing in Alaska

In this July 13, 2007, photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing restrictions that would hinder plans for a copper and gold mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region. It is the latest in a long-running dispute over efforts by developers to advance a mine in a region known for its salmon runs. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
Restrictions proposed in Pebble Mine fight

Critics of the project called the move an important step in a yearslong fight to stop the mine

Armands Veksejs, Hager Elserry, Dady Thitisakulwong, and Haewon Hong attend a farewell potluck barbecue in Nikiski on Monday, May 23, 2022. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
‘A life in a year’

Foreign exchange students receive send-off in Nikiski

A man fishes in the Kenai River on July 16, 2018, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Peninsula Clarion/file)
Ninilchik River and Deep Creek to open sport fishing

Sport fishing will be open for three upcoming weekends

Sen. Peter Micciche, R-Soldotna, stands in the Peninsula Clarion offices on Wednesday, May 25, 2022, in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Micciche will not seek reelection

His announcement comes a week after the end of the 32nd Alaska Legislature

The Boney Courthouse in downtown Anchorage, across the street from the larger Nesbett Courthouse, holds the Alaska Supreme Court chambers. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska redistricting board picks new Senate map after Supreme Court finds a gerrymander

The board could continue work and possibly write a different map for the elections from 2024 onward

A landslide blocks Lowell Point Road in Seward, Alaska, on Sunday, May 8, 2022. (Photo courtesy City of Seward)
Lowell Point Road to reopen Friday

Intermittent blasting work will continue next week

Members of the Kenai City Council participate in a council meeting on Wednesday, March 16, 2022 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Boys and girls clubs land donation postponed

The issue will be back before the body on June 1

Most Read