Star photo by Matt Tunseth Glen Trombley stands aboard his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery.

Star photo by Matt Tunseth Glen Trombley stands aboard his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery.

Peters Creek father, son start Kenai River dipnet guide service

  • By Matt Tunseth
  • Saturday, June 24, 2017 9:46pm
  • News

Glen Trombley knows his boat will get some attention this summer on the Kenai River, so he gave it a name to remember.

“It’ll be a name they won’t forget,” said the Peters Creek hunting guide, who is launching a sockeye salmon dipnetting guide service aboard a custom 28-foot aluminum pontoon boat called “The Dip Ship.”

Trombley said his daughter Alexis, who had recently returned home from college, suggested the cheeky name.

“The first thing that came out of her mouth was ‘The Dip Ship,’” he said.

Trombley hopes to attract Alaskans who don’t have boats and are unwilling or unable to participate in the annual personal use fishery at the mouth of the Kenai River. He thinks his service will appeal to anyone looking for an easier, more convenient way to access the popular fishery, which draws thousands of Alaskans to the lower Kenai River July 10-31. Each Alaska “head of household” is allowed 25 sockeye per summer, with another 10 for each additional household member. That can add up to a lot of time spent cleaning fish — which Trombley said fishermen don’t have to worry about aboard his boat.

“We do that for you,” he said.

Trombley’s son, Kody, will serve as deckhand, helping pull fish aboard and cleaning them onboard. Glen said he plans to fish six nets out of the boat, which is outfitted with a 115-horsepower Mercury four-stroke outboard engine, 27-inch railings and color-coded clickers mounted to the steering console to count fish as they’re hauled aboard.

Read more. 

Glen Trombley poses for a photo next to his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery. (Star photo by Matt Tunseth)

Glen Trombley poses for a photo next to his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery. (Star photo by Matt Tunseth)

Glen Trombley stands aboard his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery. (Star photo by Matt Tunseth)

Glen Trombley stands aboard his pontoon boat “The Dip Ship” outside his home in home in Peters Creek, Alaska on Monday, June 19, 2017. Trombley and his son, Kody, will operate the boat this summer in the Kenai River personal use salmon fishery. (Star photo by Matt Tunseth)

More in News

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
Statewide COVID cases continue drop

On Monday, Alaska’s seven-day case rate per 100,000 people was 268.6.

Anne Zink, Alaska chief medical officer, participates in a briefing with Department of Health and Social Services officials to discuss the rise of the omicron variant of the corona virus, on Nov. 29, 2021. (screenshot)
Omicron ‘an animal of its own’

State health officials emphasize unknowns, prevention measures in wake of new coronavirus variant spread.

The Kenai Community Library health section is seen on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021. The Kenai City Council voted during its Oct. 20 meeting to postpone the legislation approving grant funds after members of the community raised concerns about what books would be purchased with the money, as well as the agency awarding the grant. The council will reconsider the legislation on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
Kenai council to consider library grant again

The council earlier voted to postpone the legislation after concerns were raised about what books would be purchased.

Rep. Chris Kurka, R-Wasilla, leaves the chambers of the Alaska House of Representatives on Friday, March 19, 2021, after an hour of delays concerning the wording on his mask. On Monday, Kurka announced he was running for governor in 2022. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Wasilla rep announces gubernatorial bid

Kurka said he was motivated to run by a sense of betrayal from Dunleavy.

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Elderberry carried the Together Tree, bound for the Alaska Governor’s Mansion, up from Wrangell where it was harvested after a brief delay due to some mechanical issues. (USCG photo / Petty Officer 2nd Class Lexie Preston)
Governor’s mansion tree arrives in Juneau

No weather or floating lines could stay these Coast Guardsmen about their task.

Forever Dance students practice for the “Forever Christmas” annual holiday variety show at Kenai Central High School on Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
‘Remembering that we’re all in this together’

Forever Dance celebrates the holiday spirit with Christmas showcase.

Image via the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation
Nikiski soil treatment facility moves ahead

The facility, located at 52520 Kenai Spur Highway, has drawn ire from community residents.

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
COVID case rate continues decline; 7 new deaths reported

The state reported 632 new COVID-19 cases in Alaska.

People sit on a float by Kendall Auto Group during the “Christmas Comes to Kenai” parade on Friday, Nov. 26, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
‘It’s our biggest so far’

The holiday spirit is back in a big way with ‘Christmas Comes to Kenai’

Most Read