PCHS earns national award for being a Patient Centered Medical Home

PCHS earns national award for being a Patient Centered Medical Home

While updating the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce last week on Peninsula Community Health Services (PCHS), CEO Monica Adams announced a recognition that they have been striving to achieve. “It’s a big accomplishment for us and took us about three years to achieve it with a lot of folks putting a lot of effort into it and it really means that we truly provide high quality, efficient care for our community,” said Adams.

The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) that issued the award to PCHS for being a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) with recognition for using evidence-based, patient-centered processes that focus on highly coordinated care and long‐term, participative relationships.

The NCQA Patient-Centered Medical Home is a model of primary care that combines teamwork and information technology to improve care, improve patients’ experience of care and reduce costs. “Medical homes foster ongoing partnerships between patients and their personal clinicians, instead of approaching care as the sum of episodic office visits. Each patient’s care is overseen by clinician-led care teams that coordinate treatment across the health care system. Research shows that medical homes can lead to higher quality and lower costs, and can improve patient and provider reported experiences of care,” said Adams.

“NCQA Patient-Centered Medical Home Recognition raises the bar in defining high-quality care by emphasizing access, health information technology and coordinated care focused on patients,” said NCQA President Margaret E. O’Kane. “Recognition shows that PCHS has the tools, systems and resources to provide its patients with the right care, at the right time.” To earn recognition, which is valid for three years, PCHS demonstrated the ability to meet the program’s key elements, embodying characteristics of the medical home. NCQA standards aligned with the joint principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home established with the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Osteopathic Association.

Additionally, Adams told the Chamber that while PCHS was created to assist those without health insurance, that today they can offer assistance to those with high deductible insurance and low income, “It’s our sliding fee discount which works if you have insurance depending on your income you can qualify for a discount. So say you have a $2,000 deductible you have to meet before your coverage kicks in. If you come in to see us and say your bill is $100, if you apply and qualify for the sliding fee 50% discount, that means you only pay $50 for that day but we apply $100 or the full charge to your deductible which helps you reach your deductible at half the cost when you come to see us. What we see is that people wait until something urgent happens because they have a high deductible and put off care they may need until they reach the deductible. It’s designed to help low income families,” explained Adams.

To learn more about the services of PCHS call 260-7300. “We believe that income and money should not be a barrier to health care.”

More in News

Kenai City Manager Paul Ostrander speaks at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Kenai Municipal Airport on Friday, Aug. 6, 2021 in Kenai, Alaska. A kiosk that will offer educational programming and interpretive products about the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is coming to the airport. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsua Clarion)
Wildlife refuge kiosk coming to airport

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge stickers, T-shirts, magnets, travel stamps and enamel pins will be available.

This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. (CDC)
5 more COVID deaths reported

The total nationwide fatalities surpass population of Alaska.

Velda Geller fills goodie bags at the Kenai Senior Center on Friday, Oct. 22, 2021 for next weekend’s drive-through trick-or-treat event. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
‘This has been a lifesaver’

Seniors seek human connection as pandemic continues.

Kenai City Hall on Feb. 20, 2020, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
‘A very slippery slope that we need to be careful of’

Approval of library grant postponed after Kenai council requests to preview book purchases

This undated photo released by the Alaska State Department of Public Safety shows Robin Pelkey just before her 18th birthday. The remains of a woman known for 37 years only as Horseshoe Harriet, one of 17 victims of a notorious Alaska serial killer, have been identified through DNA profiling as Robin Pelkey, authorities said Friday, Oct. 22, 2021. (Alaska State Department of Public Safety via AP)
DNA match IDs serial killer’s victim after 37 years

Robin Pelkey was 19 and living on the streets of Anchorage when she was killed by Robert Hansen in the early 1980s, investigators said.

A moose is photographed in Kalifornsky, Alaska, in July 2020. (Peninsula Clarion file)
Illegal moose harvest down from past 5 years

The large majority of moose this year were harvested from North and South Kasilof River areas.

Renee Behymer and Katelyn Behymer (right) of Anchorage win this week’s vaccine lottery college scholarship sweepstakes. (Photo provided)
Dillingham and Anchorage residents win 6th vaccine lottery

“Get it done,” one winner said. “Protect us all, protect our elders and our grandchildren.”

Most Read