A bluff near Bryson Avenue erodes following failure of a rusty pipe. (Photo courtesy of the City of Kenai)

A bluff near Bryson Avenue erodes following failure of a rusty pipe. (Photo courtesy of the City of Kenai)

Kenai tackles bluff erosion caused by failing storm pipe

The project is located within a drainage easement between two properties at the end of Bryson Avenue.

The City of Kenai is working to address significant bluff erosion near Bryson Avenue caused by a failing storm water pipe.

The pipe, which moves storm water from Redoubt Avenue to a drain near Bryson Avenue, began failing due to rusty connections that allowed water out of the pipe before it reached the beach, according to Kenai Public Works Director Scott Curtin. The water that escaped from the pipe in turn caused parts of the bluff and sand to be carried away during storms. Curtin estimates the pipe has been there for decades.

The project is located within a drainage easement between two properties at the end of Bryson Avenue, Curtin said, but the erosion poses “minimal additional risk” to the neighboring properties.

Curtin said in an Aug. 25 memo to the Kenai City Council that project materials are expected to take a few weeks to be staged, with the total project expected to take about two months. He said Friday that project materials left Seattle on Thursday by barge and are expected to arrive in about 10 days, with work expected to begin immediately after.

Citing the “emergent” nature of the project, Curtin requested that the city council introduce and pass legislation appropriating project funding and work contract in the same meeting, which the council did during its Sept. 1 meeting. The council also voted during that meeting to bump contingency funding for the project from $15,000 to $45,000.

According to the city’s bid advertisement, work will include clearing the site, installing a stormwater manhole, piping, filling and final grading on the bluff. The legislation approved by the council on Wednesday also authorized a contract between the city and Foster’s Construction, which is said to have experience with similar projects. The company offered the lowest bid, at around $310,000.

Including design and construction costs as well as city administration and permit fees and the additional contingency approved Wednesday, the project is expected to cost around $375,000.

The Kenai City Council’s full Wednesday meeting can be viewed on the city’s YouTube channel.

Reach reporter Ashlyn O’Hara at ashlyn.ohara@peninsulaclarion.com.

A bluff near Bryson Avenue erodes following failure of a rusty pipe. (Photo courtesy of the City of Kenai)

A bluff near Bryson Avenue erodes following failure of a rusty pipe. (Photo courtesy of the City of Kenai)

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