Kenai Peninsula College: Around Campus

KPC students are back in classes today and enrollment across the KPC system remains stable. At this year’s spring convocation, held on Jan. 5, KPC Director Gary Turner reported to staff and faculty that the college is fortunate to see spring semester’s current enrollment essentially flat compared to the same period last year.

As has been the trend for the past year, many institutions around the state are seeing decreasing enrollments.

“Again this semester, seeing flat enrollments is considered very positive in the current university climate. Overall, the University of Alaska is seeing a four percent decline compared to the same period last year,” Turner said.

Turner also informed employees that KPC remains the third largest UA campus (head count and student credit hours) behind Anchorage and Fairbanks, followed by Juneau and Mat-Su.

At press time, KPC’s enrollment had increased slightly from Jan. 5 in comparison to spring 2014 semester. Late registration for the current semester will be available on campus through Jan. 16.

For more information, contact Student Services at 262-0330 or email iyinfo@kpc.alaska.edu.

KPC’s process technology degree comes out on top

The UAA Institute of Social and Economic Research recently released a report titled “UAA Graduates: How Many Stay and Work in Alaska?” The research was coordinated by ISER in collaboration with UAA’s Office of Institutional Research and the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

The report summarized that most graduates stay in state for at least five years and work throughout the Alaska economy. They also determined that five years after students graduate from UAA locations, their earnings double.

There were several interesting findings that focused on KPC degree programs. According to the report, graduates who earned KPC associate of applied science degrees in process technology and occupational safety and health, rank first and third in average earnings five years after receiving their degrees when compared to all other UAA degrees (master’s, bachelor’s, and other associate degrees).

It was determined that students who earned the process technology AAS from 2003-2007 top the earnings category among all other UAA degrees averaging $105,627 annually. The process technology degree program is offered at KPC’s Kenai River Campus in Soldotna and at the Anchorage Extension Site. There were 68 students who earned KPC process technology degrees between July 2013 and July 2014.

KPC’s occupational safety and health AAS, available completely online and at the Anchorage Extension Site, came in third in the earnings list with graduates earning average annual wages of $76,909.

Students graduating with UAA’s masters of business administration degrees earn on average $101,200 annually ranking second in the earning category.

“The strong demand for these (Process Technology) graduates is clear in their earnings: five years after getting process technology degrees, 2003-2007 graduates earned on average more than $100,000. That was double the average for all UAA graduates — and far more than the average for civil engineers or those with master’s degrees,” the report stated. On average, UAA graduates earned $51,000 (adjusted for inflation) five years after receiving their degrees.

Visit the ISER website at http://www.iser.uaa.alaska.edu to view and download the entire report.

 

This column is provided by Suzie Kendrick, Advancement Programs Manager at Kenai Peninsula College.

More in News

COVID-19 (Image courtesy CDC)
State reports 3 more COVID deaths, more than 900 cases

The newly reported deaths push Alaska’s total to 594 COVID fatalities since the beginning of the pandemic.

In this July 1908 photograph provided by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office, the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear sits at anchor while on Bering Sea Patrol off Alaska. The wreckage of the storied vessel, that served in two World Wars and patrolled frigid Arctic waters for decades, has been found, the Coast Guard said Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021. (U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office via AP)
Coast Guard: Wreck found in Atlantic is storied cutter Bear

The ship performed patrols in waters off Alaska for decades.

The Federal Aviation Administration released an initiative to improve flight safety in Alaska for all aviation on Oct. 14, 2021. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)
FAA releases Alaska aviation safety initiatives

The recommendations, covering five areas, range from improvements in hardware to data-gathering.

Kyle Kornelis speaks at a public meeting about the Runway 7-25 Rehabilitation Project on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna airport unveils revamped runway

Runway 7-25 was temporarily closed earlier this year while it underwent renovations.

Alaska Redistricting Board Director Peter Torkelson speaks at a redistricting open house on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Alaska Redistricting Board Director Peter Torkelson speaks at a redistricting open house on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Redistricting proposals draw concerns from local residents

The state is seeking feedback on the best way to redraw the state’s legislative district boundaries in the wake of the 2020 census.

Signs advertising COVID-19 safety protocoals stand outside the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex on Oct. 6, 2020, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion)
Ordinance seeks more funding for sports complex renovations

Approved for introduction by the Soldotna City Council during their Oct. 13 meeting, the legislation would put an extra $583,000 toward the project

Most Read