The Homer Courthouse. (Homer News file photo)

The Homer Courthouse. (Homer News file photo)

Homer man accused of attempted murder and assault

The man allegedly attacked a family member following an argument.

A Homer man has been accused of attempted murder and several counts of assault following a violent incident near the Fritz Creek area on Monday.

Julian Massey, 51, was charged Monday with one count each of second-degree attempted murder, first-degree assault, second-degree assault, third-degree assault, fourth-degree assault and interfering with the report of a domestic violence crime. Massey allegedly attacked a family member following an argument, according to an affidavit written by Alaska State Trooper Marco Fischer.

Troopers were called to interview the alleged victim Monday night. The person was later taken to another location for further treatment of significant injuries, including a reported brain bleed, according to the affidavit.

First, second and third-degree assault involves a person “recklessly (causing) serious physical injury to another by means of a dangerous instrument,” according to the charging documents in the case. Massey allegedly used some kind of plastic bag as well as some kind of cloth to cover or restrict the person’s face and neck during the assault, according to the affidavit. Fischer also wrote that the alleged victim reported Massey threatened with a knife.

According to the affidavit, Massey later drove the person to the hospital. Following the interview at the hospital, troopers contacted Massey at his home. Fischer wrote that they were able to speak with him on the phone, on the back deck of the home and in the entry way.

“Julian (Massey) initially had on body armor and was armed with a firearm,” Fischer wrote of when troopers arrived to speak with Massey.

Troopers wrote in an online dispatch report that they took Massey into custody without further incident.

The alleged victim reported telling Fischer they originally had a phone and was going to call for help, but that Massey took the phone, according to the affidavit. That’s where the charge of interfering with the report of a domestic violence crime comes in.

Massey was arraigned Tuesday morning at the Homer Courthouse. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for March 20.

Attempted second-degree murder and first-degree assault are Class A felonies in Alaska, which are punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. Second-degree assault is a Class B felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $100,000. Third-degree assault is a Class C felony, punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $50,000. Fourth-degree assault and interfering with the report of a domestic violence crime are Class A misdemeanors, which are punishable by up to a year in jail and a fine of up to $10,000.

Fischer wrote in the affidavit that troopers were charging Massey with tampering with physical evidence, but that charge is not yet included in charging documents in the case.

Reach Megan Pacer at mpacer@homernews.com.

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