This November 21, 2015 shows the sign designating the unofficial border of Nikiski, Alaska. (Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Gasline project to announce Spur reroute June 20

Nikiski residents who’ve been waiting since 2015 to find out whether a proposed relocation of the Kenai Spur Highway will run on or near their land will find out June 20, when the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation makes public its selected route for moving the Kenai Spur Highway around the planned liquified natural gas export terminal in Nikiski.

The June 20 meeting at the North Peninsula Recreation Center will start with an open house at at 6 p.m and a presentation at 7 p.m, according to an email from AGDC Stakeholder Engagement Director Lisa Parker. Parker can be contacted for more information by phone at 907-330-6305 or by email at lparker@agdc.us.

Around 2015 the gasline project began considering 26 possible reroutes for the Spur Highway, whose existing path between roughly mile 19.5 and mile 21 passes through the approximately 900-acre footprint of the planned LNG plant. In January, AGDC — the state-owned corporation that has been leading the project since late 2016 — narrowed the possibilities to two: a “west alternative” that would branch from the existing highway around Mile 19 and pass inside Miller Loop Road, and an “east alternative” that would leave the existing highway around Mile 18 and run outside Miller Loop to the east.

After Nikiski residents commented on the two routes in a Feb. 12 meeting, AGDC Communications Manager Jesse Carlstrom said AGDC created a variant for each “taking into account community feedback, environmental impact mitigations, and cost considerations.” AGDC also began considering another possibility proposed by Nikiski resident Richard McGahan. Of these five possibilities, AGDC officials selected a route that will be subject to approval from AGDC’s seven-member board of directors before the company makes it public on June 20.

“The intent is to make the announcement to everybody all at once in person, and to let Nikiski residents know first,” Carlstrom said.

Following the route selection, Carlstrom said “the next step will be advance the Kenai Spur Highway project into the design phase once AGDC obtains funding.”

Reach Ben Boettger at bboettger@peninsulaclarion.com.

More in News

The show must go on

American icons to take stage in outdoor July 4 performance

Soldotna’s Chase Gable, a customer service agent with Grant Aviation, prepares to load and unload baggage from a plane at Kenai Municipal Airport on Tuesday, June 30, 2020, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Jeff Helminiak/Peninsula Clarion)
Airport sees decline in traffic in wake of pandemic, Ravn exit

Passengers leaving Kenai this year through May are down 18,000.

Registered Nurse Cathy Davis (left) and Chief Nursing Officer Dawn Johnson (right) work at a table to get COVID-19 tests ready for the public Friday, May 29, 2020 at the Boat House Pavilion on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. South Peninsula Hospital is now offering free COVID-19 testing for asymptomatic people with no appointments necessary at the Boat House Pavilion through June 6. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)
3 cities, 3 testing strategies

Peninsula communities take different approaches to COVID-19 testing.

Cars pass the City of Homer advisory signs on Wednesday morning, June 24, 2020, at Mile 172 Sterling Highway near West Hill Road in Homer, Alaska. The sign also reads “Keep COVID-19 out of Homer.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
‘Don’t get complacent,’ governor says of pandemic

Alaska saw 36 new cases of COVID-19 in residents and 12 new nonresident cases.

Refuge reopens some trails to public

Burn areas provide new views

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. (CDC via AP, File)
More positive for COVID in Seward as testing expands

The city conducted more than 300 tests for COVID-19 over the weekend.

COVID-19. (CDC)
COVID-19 in Alaska: By the numbers

Recent cases have been identified after possible exposure in bars and other similar venues.

Alaska Attorney General Kevin Clarkson testifies before state senators during a confirmation hearing on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, in Juneau. (Becky Bohrer | Associated Press File)
Clarkson says city mask order doesn’t apply to state offices

Anchorage mayor signed an order Friday requiring face coverings in certain indoor public settings.

A sign detailing modified health protocols for the Wednesday Market is seen here at Soldotna Creek Park in Soldotna, Alaska on June 10, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna passes policy on gatherings

The policy is an amended version of one crafted by City Manager Stephanie Queen.

Most Read