From left, Bristol Bay Reserve Association Board member Mike LaRussa, Bristol Bay Native Association President/CEO Ralph Andersen, Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association Executive Director Andy Wink, United Tribes of Bristol Bay Deputy Director Lindsay Layland, Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation President and CEO Norm Van Vactor, and Robin Samuelson of Bristol Bay Native Corporation, make statements at the Federal Courthouse in Anchorage, Alaska Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. Critics of the Pebble Mine planned near headwaters of a major Alaska salmon fishery are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, saying EPA improperly withdrew proposed restrictions on development in that region. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

From left, Bristol Bay Reserve Association Board member Mike LaRussa, Bristol Bay Native Association President/CEO Ralph Andersen, Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association Executive Director Andy Wink, United Tribes of Bristol Bay Deputy Director Lindsay Layland, Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation President and CEO Norm Van Vactor, and Robin Samuelson of Bristol Bay Native Corporation, make statements at the Federal Courthouse in Anchorage, Alaska Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. Critics of the Pebble Mine planned near headwaters of a major Alaska salmon fishery are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, saying EPA improperly withdrew proposed restrictions on development in that region. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

EPA sued over mine restrictions

The lawsuit alleges EPA has failed to provide a “reasoned explanation” for its change in position.

  • Tuesday, October 8, 2019 10:52pm
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