Gov. Mike Dunleavy, seated left, and Lt. Gov. Nancy Dahlstrom sign their oaths of office during the inauguration ceremony, Monday, Dec. 5, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Dunleavy, a Republican, last month became the first Alaska governor since Democrat Tony Knowles in 1998 to win back-to-back terms. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Gov. Mike Dunleavy, seated left, and Lt. Gov. Nancy Dahlstrom sign their oaths of office during the inauguration ceremony, Monday, Dec. 5, 2022, in Anchorage, Alaska. Dunleavy, a Republican, last month became the first Alaska governor since Democrat Tony Knowles in 1998 to win back-to-back terms. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Dunleavy, Dahlstrom take oaths of office

Gov. Dunleavy was reelected during the Nov. 8 general election

Gov. Mike Dunleavy and Lt. Gov. Nancy Dahlstrom during speeches given at their shared swearing-in ceremony on Monday emphasized the importance of collaboration and forward-thinking for the next four years in office.

The duo took their oaths of office at the Alaska Airlines Center in Anchorage, which marked the beginning of Dunleavy’s second four-year term as governor and the first for Dahlstrom, who replaces outgoing Lt. Gov. Kevin Meyer.

Dunleavy and Dahlstrom’s ticket clinched about 50.3% of the more than 263,000 ballots cast during the Nov. 8 general election. Because they received more than 50% of the vote, the race did not need to advance to a ranked choice runoff.

Monday’s inauguration ceremony featured performances by dancers with the Alaska Native Heritage Center, the 11th Airborne Division Band and members of the Pipeline Vocal Project, among others.

In an address to attendees, Dahlstrom, who is a former state lawmaker and commissioner of the Department of Corrections, said she is “honored” to serve alongside Dunleavy and that Alaskans will see progress, opportunities and results during her tenure as lieutenant governor.

“I promise that over the next four years, I will serve you to the best of my ability and I will dedicate myself to making an Alaska where our grandchildren can grow up and thrive,” Dahlstrom said.

Dunleavy said during his address that he has “a great partner” in Dahlstrom and that he doesn’t take the responsibility of being governor “lightly.” He said he is looking forward to working with the Alaska Legislature and local governments as the state prepares to face “uncertain times.”

“We have a tremendous opportunity over the next four years again to work together to make this a state that is going to be inviting for our kids and our grandkids,” Dunleavy said.

Monday’s full ceremony can be streamed on Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s YouTube channel.

Reach reporter Ashlyn O’Hara at ashlyn.ohara@peninsulaclarion.com.

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