Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion  Several nuns wait for their cue to go on during a dress rehearsal for the Nikiski Middle-High School musical theater class production of the "Sound of Music" on Wednesday April 22, 2015 in Nikiski, Alaska.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Several nuns wait for their cue to go on during a dress rehearsal for the Nikiski Middle-High School musical theater class production of the "Sound of Music" on Wednesday April 22, 2015 in Nikiski, Alaska.

Classic “Sound of Music” show opens in Nikiski

  • By Rashah McChesney
  • Wednesday, April 22, 2015 6:57pm
  • News

The week before a show opens is typically hectic — and the Nikiski Middle-High School’s production of the “Sound of Music” is no different. Flocks of elaborately costumed nuns, von Trapps and many of the 40-something cast members in school’s musical theater class gathered around the stage, waiting for director Joe Rizzo to tell them where to go.

As the group planned their final rehearsals, members of the stagecraft class put the finishing touches on the set on stage. A small group of actors practiced moving an unwieldy set piece after a scene.

They practiced for nearly six hours on Wednesday, Rizzo said. The show opens Friday and the group will showcase nearly four months of rehearsal and class time spent on the Rodgers & Hammerstein classic about a young nun who proves to high-spirited for a religious calling and instead becomes a governess for the seven children of a widowed military Captain. Her antics with the children capture the Captain’s heart and the two marry. The family’s narrow escape from Austria — which is invaded by Nazis — is set to music that the two senior girls playing Maria von Trapp found to be enchanting.

“It’s my favorite musical,” said Sadie Avril. “I’ve seen it like 500 times.”

Avril will play Maria during the Friday shows and Mira Solmonson will play the part during the Saturday shows. The two also take turns playing the Baroness Schraeder who tries unsuccessfully to woo the Captain away from Maria von Trapp.

As a set crew painted behind them, both said they most enjoyed singing “My Favorite Things” as Maria.

“It personally does make me happier,” Solmonson said. “Not just in the musical and how I’m supposed to feel, but literally I will go home, sing it to myself and it will make me happier.”

They also agreed that audiences will enjoy “Sixteen Going on Seventeen,” between a young Liesl von Trap — played by Erin O’Brien — and her love interest Rolf, played by Garratt Dohse.

In it, Rolf tells Liesl that she is a young girl, verging on womanhood and she can depend on him for guidance because he is a year older.

“They did such a good job,” Avril said.

The cast and crew have been working on the show since January and Rizzo said most of the students at the high school have pitched in to help with the production.

Rizzo said audiences will see a stage production that is different from the movie they remember.

“The play is similar to the film, but a lot of the dialogue is different,” he said. “(In the movie) they changed the script to be not-so-sweet, to be a little more somber.”

Reach Rashah McChesney at rashah.mcchesney@peninsulaclarion.com or follow her on Twitter @litmuslens

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Lorilee Whitcomb, junior and Destiny Owens, junior, paint a portion of the "Sound of Music" set during their stagecraft class on Wednesday April 22, 2015 at Nikiski Middle-High School in Nikiski, Alaska. The show opens on Friday April 24 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students at $10 general admission.

Photo by Rashah McChesney/Peninsula Clarion Lorilee Whitcomb, junior and Destiny Owens, junior, paint a portion of the “Sound of Music” set during their stagecraft class on Wednesday April 22, 2015 at Nikiski Middle-High School in Nikiski, Alaska. The show opens on Friday April 24 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students at $10 general admission.

More in News

COVID-19 (Image courtesy CDC)
State reports 3 more COVID deaths, more than 900 cases

The newly reported deaths push Alaska’s total to 594 COVID fatalities since the beginning of the pandemic.

In this July 1908 photograph provided by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office, the U.S. Revenue Cutter Bear sits at anchor while on Bering Sea Patrol off Alaska. The wreckage of the storied vessel, that served in two World Wars and patrolled frigid Arctic waters for decades, has been found, the Coast Guard said Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021. (U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office via AP)
Coast Guard: Wreck found in Atlantic is storied cutter Bear

The ship performed patrols in waters off Alaska for decades.

The Federal Aviation Administration released an initiative to improve flight safety in Alaska for all aviation on Oct. 14, 2021. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)
FAA releases Alaska aviation safety initiatives

The recommendations, covering five areas, range from improvements in hardware to data-gathering.

Kyle Kornelis speaks at a public meeting about the Runway 7-25 Rehabilitation Project on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna airport unveils revamped runway

Runway 7-25 was temporarily closed earlier this year while it underwent renovations.

Alaska Redistricting Board Director Peter Torkelson speaks at a redistricting open house on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Alaska Redistricting Board Director Peter Torkelson speaks at a redistricting open house on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Redistricting proposals draw concerns from local residents

The state is seeking feedback on the best way to redraw the state’s legislative district boundaries in the wake of the 2020 census.

Signs advertising COVID-19 safety protocoals stand outside the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex on Oct. 6, 2020, in Soldotna, Alaska. (Photo by Erin Thompson/Peninsula Clarion)
Ordinance seeks more funding for sports complex renovations

Approved for introduction by the Soldotna City Council during their Oct. 13 meeting, the legislation would put an extra $583,000 toward the project

Most Read