In this July 20, 2013 file photo, several thousand dipnetters converged onto the mouth of the Kenai River to catch a share of the late run of sockeye salmon headed into the river in Kenai, Alaska. (Peninsula Clarion file photo/Rashah McChesney)

In this July 20, 2013 file photo, several thousand dipnetters converged onto the mouth of the Kenai River to catch a share of the late run of sockeye salmon headed into the river in Kenai, Alaska. (Peninsula Clarion file photo/Rashah McChesney)

City announces health and safety measures for dipnet fishery

Dipnetters should socially distance, wear face coverings when needed and wash hands and surfaces.

The City of Kenai announced Monday that due to the COVID-19 pandemic it will put more focus on health and safety when the dipnet fishery opens July 10.

“In previous years, we’ve asked participants to respect the beaches and treat them like your own,” City Manager Paul Ostrander said in the release. “This year, we’re adding to that and asking that those who come to Kenai take steps to prevent transmission: keep your distance from others, wear face coverings when you are within six feet of others, wash hands and surfaces, and stay home when sick.”

The City of Kenai will only accept credit cards as payment for accessing the beaches. Credit card readers will be installed outside the kiosks that will allow customers to swipe their own cards, and no signatures will be required. Intercoms will also be set up so that city employees can communicate with customers while social distancing.

Hand-washing stations will be provided in addition to portable toilets on the north and south shores. Dumpsters will also be available on the south beach and in the parking lot for the north beach.

Camping will be allowed on the beaches, but campsites and tents should be spaced apart from other campsites of nonhousehold members. Camping is not allowed in the dunes.

More information on the dipnet fishery can be found at www.kenai.city.

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