August primary ballot set

  • By DAN BALMER
  • Tuesday, June 3, 2014 11:29pm
  • News

Now that the deadline to file for state office passed Monday, 11 Kenai Peninsula residents will be on the August primary ballot.

Kenai Peninsula Borough Assemblyman Kelly Wolf is running for Lieutenant Governor, a position made vacant when Mead Treadwell announced his candidacy for U.S. Senate. Wolf, a Republican, currently represents the Kalifornsky Beach District on the borough assembly, and his term expires in 2015.

Wolf said he has invested the last 18 years working with Youth Restoration corps, a non-profit organization that gets kids involved in community projects throughout Alaska.

“As Lt. Governor, I wish to use this experience to continue helping our youth, elderly, disabled and our veterans because as Alaskans we are big hearted and helpful of one another,” he said.

Wolf is one of two Republicans running for Lt. Governor. Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan is the other candidate. A third, Lesil McGuire, R-Anchorage, withdrew her candidacy.

Two candidates will be challenging two current state representatives for their seats in Juneau. Nikiski resident Rocky Knudsen has filed as a Democrat in District 29 and will run against the Speaker of the House Mike Chenault, R-Nikiski, who was first elected in 2000.

Kenai resident Shauna Thornton has filed as a Democratic candidate for State Representative for District 30 against Rep. Kurt Olson, R-Soldotna.

Thornton, who is on the Kenai Peninsula College council, said she is a big proponent of higher education and it will be one of her main platforms. She said she is running to protect Alaskan values and will focus on promoting a hardworking, ethical and transparent legislature.

Olson, who has held office since 2004, said he would like to finish the progress he’s made on the worker’s compensation and make long-term fixes to education funding.

Soldotna resident Eric Treider, who is running as an independent, will challenge Sen. Peter Micciche, R-Kenai, for District O in the general election.

Treider said he decided to run as a non-partisan because he believes campaign money is part of the problem in politics. For his campaign, he will only accept money from individuals and no more than $100 instead of from corporations.

He said he would like to see Senate Bill 21 corrected and change the trend of politicians ignoring the will of the people.

“Oil companies have the pin number to the state checking account,” Treider said.

Micciche, former Soldotna mayor, was elected to the state senate over incumbent Sen. Tom Wagoner in the 2012 primary and won the general election.

Rep. Paul Seaton, R-Homer will run unopposed for District 31. Seaton was first elected to the chamber in 2002.

Seven names will be on the August primary ballot for Governor, including Brad Snowden, a Republican from Seward.

Two candidates from the southern Kenai Peninsula have filed for United States Representative. John Cox, a Republican from Anchor Point and Frank Vondersaar, a Democrat from Homer.

Reach Dan Balmer at daniel.balmer@peninsulaclarion.com

More in News

Kenai City Hall on Feb. 20, 2020, in Kenai, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Grocery incentive program goes live Monday in Kenai

The program aims to help people double the money they are able to spend on groceries and household goods

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks at an Anchorage news conference on Dec. 11, 2020. (Courtesy photo / Office of Gov. Mike Dunleavy)
Governor tests positive for virus

Dunleavy had been in quarantine since learning Sunday.

This undated map shows three wildlife enhancement projects on the southern Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, planned or done by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. (Map courtesy of Alaska Department of Fish and Game)
3 projects on southern Kenai Peninsula aim to benefit moose habitat

Cut willow bushes will regenerate into higher protein browse for moose

State health officials address members of the media during a virtual press conference on Wednesday, Feb. 24 in Alaska. (Screenshot)
State to receive over 100,000 doses for March

The 103,120 figure is comparable to the allocations Alaska received for December, January and February combined.

Kenai River Brown Bears defenseman Shayne Monahan controls the puck early in the third period as 1,113 fans watch Friday, March 24, 2017, at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex. (Photo by Jeff Helminiak/Peninsula Clarion)
Brown Bears to return after council loosens sports center mitigation

The resolution increases the number of spectators allowed at events to 750

This undated photo shows a section of Deep Creek near Ninilchik, Alalska recently acquired by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game with the assistance of the Kachemak Heritage Land Trust to protect hunting and fishing in the area. (Photo courtesy of Kachemak Heritage Land Trust)
State, feds and land trust work together to acquire 93.5 acres for conservation

Oil spill trust fund used to buy fish habitat on valuable salmon stream

Mile 93 of the Sterling Highway (511.Alaska.gov)
Sterling Highway reopens following accident

The road reopened Wednesday evening

Ryanna Thurman uses a holds locker at the Soldotna Public Library on Friday, Jan. 15 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Soldotna departments reflect on COVID response

Library, parks and rec, emergency services and IT gave feedback on 2020 performance.

Air-source heat pumps, like the one in this 2015 photo of Jake Eames, right, and David Nash installing a pump, are an example of a load-side technology that can increase energy efficiency. "Load-side technologies are absolutely key to our ability to reduce greenhouse emissions in the energy sector,” said director of energy services at Alaska Electric Light and Power Alec Mesdag.
In Juneau, going green focuses on power usage

The electricity’s already clean.

Most Read