Around Campus: Kenai River Campus paramedic, nursing labs expanded

  • By Suzie Kendrick
  • Sunday, May 11, 2014 6:44pm
  • NewsSchools

After years of moving equipment in and out of cabinets and storage spaces, KRC nursing and paramedic students will finally have dedicated lab spaces to practice their skills. Two areas in the Goodrich building, previously dedicated to the process technology and instrumentation programs, have been remodeled to house the emergency medical and nursing programs.

No one is more excited about the new lab space than Paramedic Coordinator Paul Perry, assistant professor of paramedic technology.

“We went from a single classroom/lab combination to one of the most modern EMS training facilities in the entire country. The completely customized lab allows for students to respond to simulated emergencies while the instructor manages the call from a command room,” Perry said.

As the students treat the simulated patient they can move them from a simulation room (that could be set up as a home, a store, a restaurant or bar) into the back of the ambulance simulator to continue care and transport. Upon arrival at the hospital the patient is moved into another simulation room set up like an Emergency Department and care is transferred to a physician. This entire process is recorded and can be played back showing the students where they were successful, or where improvements may still be needed.

The smart-classroom will be utilized by both the EMS classes (Paramedic, Advanced & Basic level EMTs), and in the evenings the Firefighter programs will use it for their didactic sessions and the space can be utilized for specific fire search and rescue scenarios.”

Perry says plans include having local medical professionals come into the classroom and teach mini-sessions in their specific fields of medicine. These sessions will be offered monthly and local fire department and emergency personnel can log into the webinar, dubbed eGrand Rounds at KPC, to receive quality continuing education experiences.

The KPC nursing program has also moved into their new lab, an area three times the size of their old one. The new lab includes a three-bed simulated hospital unit, a video conferencing classroom, faculty offices and storage space. The nursing program is part of the UAA College of Nursing and admits eight students on the Kenai River Campus annually.

The application period for the 2014-2015 paramedic program is open through May 16. For more information, contact Perry at 262-0378.

Student Art Exhibition award recipients announced

According to the KRC Art Students’ League Association, this year’s annual Student Art Show was a great success. The show’s closing reception, held in the G.L. Freeburg Gallery last Friday, included the announcement of all the award winners. The exhibit was juried by Bill Heath and Marion Nelson, and Cam Choy, KRC’s associate professor of art.

There were two Best of Show awards this year; Chelsea Springer (Honey) and Lisa Franzmann (Friends). There were also two Juror’s Choice awards which went to Alisah Kress (Victoriam Aureum), and Brandi Kerley (Inside Out). The four Honorable Mentions went to Clarisa Frey (Float), Carol Beverly (Dawn on Kachemak Bay), Nita Dreyer (My Immortal) and Victoria Glick (Feathers).

Two student artists, Jessica Isenman-Bookey and Chelsea Springer, had pieces purchased by the college for the KRC permanent collection.

Upcoming campus closures

KPC’s Kenai River Campus will be closed on May 15 so staff can attend the annual UAA Development Day in Anchorage. The campus is also closed on May 26 in observance of Memorial Day.

 

This column is provided by Suzie Kendrick, Advancement Programs Manager at Kenai Peninsula College.

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