Passengers at the Juneau International Airport make their way past signage notifying the public about the state’s travel restrictions on Monday, Nov. 15, 2020. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services released a request for information seeking to determine interest among potential contractors to provide a one-dose vaccine to interested travelers in a secure section of the airports in Anchorage, Juneau, Fairbanks and Ketchikan. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

Passengers at the Juneau International Airport make their way past signage notifying the public about the state’s travel restrictions on Monday, Nov. 15, 2020. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services released a request for information seeking to determine interest among potential contractors to provide a one-dose vaccine to interested travelers in a secure section of the airports in Anchorage, Juneau, Fairbanks and Ketchikan. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

Alaska health department floats idea of airport vaccinations

Could vaccines be coming to Alaska’s busiest airports?

By Becky Bohrer

Associated Press

The state health department is floating the idea of providing COVID-19 vaccinations to travelers at Alaska’s busiest airports with the summer tourism and fishing seasons looming.

The department released a request for information Wednesday, seeking to determine interest among potential contractors to provide a one-dose vaccine to interested travelers in a secure section of the airports in Anchorage, Juneau, Fairbanks and Ketchikan.

“As Alaska’s essential workers, industry workers, seasonal employees, resident travelers and out-of-state travel increases during the May-October 2021 timeframe, implementing strategies to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 through Alaska’s communities and individuals is critical,” the request states.

One of the vaccines available for emergency use is a one-dose shot, which the department says its Division of Public Health intends to use for such a program, subject to availability. Under emergency use authorizations, people 18 or older can receive that shot, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC considers people fully vaccinated two weeks after receiving a single-dose vaccine or two weeks after their second dose of a two-shot vaccine.

The state health department request asks interested contractors to provide staffing plans and estimates for what they think it would cost to administer the program.

Officials have said Alaska continues to provide testing for COVID-19 at airports, though such tests are not required since a disaster declaration ended last month.

There is an ongoing debate at the state Capitol over whether a disaster declaration is needed. Gov. Mike Dunleavy has argued it is not, and is instead asking lawmakers for what he calls “limited tools to navigate what has become the endgame of COVID-19.”

Dunleavy’s administration, which in January proposed a disaster declaration through September, said circumstances have changed since then. The state health commissioner, Adam Crum, told lawmakers Wednesday he does not believe Alaska’s COVID-19 situation rises to the level of being declared a disaster under state disaster laws.

According to the state health department, 27% of Alaskans 16 or older are considered fully vaccinated.

Dunleavy, a Republican, in a letter to lawmakers said declaring a disaster could “lead travelers to incorrectly assume that Alaska’s situation is deteriorating, jeopardizing the livelihoods of those working in one of our largest and hardest-hit industries.”

Some lawmakers argue the state should err on the side of caution and provide Dunleavy with the powers available under state disaster laws, whether he wants to use those or not. Others have shown interested in authorizing narrower powers.

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