TJ and Kinsie pose by a carving. Courtesy image.

TJ and Kinsie pose by a carving. Courtesy image.

Weaving the Future, Carving the Past

It is a couple weeks shy of Father’s Day but TJ Young is not waiting for the holiday to share what a proud dad he is of his daughter.

Having begun weaving at the age of 11, the now 13 year old Kinsie Young will be showcasing two of her pieces — a headband and a ravenstail weaving medicine pouch — at the Juried Youth Art Exhibit hosted today through Saturday at this year’s Celebration. This will be the first time she has ever entered her work into a big art exhibit.

“I’m glad she got started at a young age,” TJ said. “I wish I would (have) gotten started at a younger age. I didn’t get my first set of carving tools from my mom until I was 17 and it was the best gift I ever had. I still have the same tools and am still using them.”

Kinsie begun weaving after she received an instructional kit as a gift from her parents featuring weaver Cheryl Samuel of Vancouver Island on DVD. The kit also came with a booklet and enough materials for Kinsie to weave three medicine bags. In the beginning, Kinsie and her mother sat down to study the materials together. Both parents have continued to offer a listening ear to Kinsie’s questions of what color or weave pattern she should choose for her next project, and TJ has even gone as far as reaching out to weaver Albert Hans from Skidegate and Haida Gwaii to receive different patterns Kinsie could follow. The most recent piece made by Kinsie’s hands rests on the head of her newborn sister: a tiny ravenstail headband.

For the rest of this story, visit the Capital City Weekly.

Kinsie’s newborn sister, Kai Kuniisii, wears the ravenstail headband Kinsie weaved for her. “Kuniisii” means ancestor in Haida. Courtesy image.

Kinsie’s newborn sister, Kai Kuniisii, wears the ravenstail headband Kinsie weaved for her. “Kuniisii” means ancestor in Haida. Courtesy image.

Kinsie’s headband and medicine pouch. Courtesy image.

Kinsie’s headband and medicine pouch. Courtesy image.

TJ’s shaman mask. Courtesy image.

TJ’s shaman mask. Courtesy image.

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