In this Wednesday, July 12, 2017 photo, people walk among the stalls at the Soldotna Wednesday Market in Soldotna, Alaska. The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce organizes the market each week for local vendors and features local musicians. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

In this Wednesday, July 12, 2017 photo, people walk among the stalls at the Soldotna Wednesday Market in Soldotna, Alaska. The Soldotna Chamber of Commerce organizes the market each week for local vendors and features local musicians. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Progress Days market features food, crafts, music and more

Similar to the Wednesday Market in Soldotna, the Progress Days market Saturday and Sunday, July 27 and 28, will be full of craft and food vendors, live music and more.

Andrew Heuiser, the events and programs director at the Soldotna Chamber of Commerce said the Progress Days market gets a huge turnout. He says the market will often see vendors from Anchorage, Seward and other places around Alaska set up shop for the weekend in Soldotna Creek Park.

Many local food vendors will be at the market to satisfy hungry appetites. For their fourth year in a row, Wok n’ Roll will be at Progress Days serving owner, Raquel Hawkins’ Filipino specialties. Market goers can feast on hand-rolled lumpia, adobo, curry and dumplings. Yo! Taco has been serving the Progress Days market for three years now. They said they have changed their menu every year, and offer different types of street tacos. Owner Nila Sanchez works at Yo! Taco with her friends and family.

Both Saturday and Sunday will feature live music and activities. Sunday, the traditional city picnic will start at noon with free hot dogs, chips and drinks for the community.

Live music from Forever Dance, DDP, Ledgers and Christ Towne begins at 1 p.m. and goes until 3 p.m. Saturday. Sunday features longer sets from Mario Carboni, Chris Robinson and Hobo Jim from noon to 3 p.m.

The Progress Days market is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and, from noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday at Soldotna Creek Park.

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