Learning for Life: Pieces of the puzzle

Did you make a New Year’s Resolution? Nearly half of all Americans make a resolution each year; with weight loss and improved health being among the most popular. Unfortunately, only about 8 percent of us actually keep our resolutions. Why? Most goals are simply too big to reach. Instead of setting ourselves up for failure, let’s explore ways to make good health attainable.

All the foods we eat should fit together like a puzzle. Every puzzle fan knows to first find the corners, which will establish a guide for the rest of the pieces. The cornerstones of a healthy diet are: eating a colorful variety of vegetables and fruits, more whole grains, lean protein, and low-fat, calcium rich foods. Other puzzle pieces include: limiting sugars, saturated fats and sodium, as well as including physical activity. Some days your puzzle will be more complete than others; but if you focus on making gradual improvements rather than giant changes, you stand a better chance of forming a healthy eating pattern and achieving your goal of good health.

Stop by our office for a handout or visit www.choosemyplate.gov for more information.

Submitted by Amorette Payment, UAF Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Educator, Kenai Peninsula District.

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