Beasto Blanco to play Hooligans

Submitted Photo

Submitted Photo

A beast is coming to the Kenai Peninsula.

Beasto Blanco, a rock ‘n’ roll group with members from all over the globe, will take the stage at Hooligans Bar and Saloon this Saturday night.

The group’s members are no strangers to the spotlight. Lead vocalist Chuck Garric has been a member of Alice Cooper’s band for more than a decade. Other Beasto Blanco members include Alaska’s Chris Latham, Germans Tim Husung and Jan LeGrow. Calico Cooper, daughter of Alice Cooper, will also perform with the band.

“Calico is our little secret weapon,” Garric said.

Garric described Beasto Blanco’s sound as White Zombie and Motorhead having a drink at a bar.

“We’re fans of rock and roll,” Garric said. “If you blend in some of the 70s rock ‘n’ roll with some of the newer sounds, that’s what Beasto Blanco is.”

While he said the group provides a sense of mayhem, Beasto Blanco ultimately plays to entertain and their shows encompass everything a good rock ‘n’ roll show should.

“We’re a rock and roll band,” he said. “Our sound is intended to be loud and catchy. It’s a sound with an attitude.”

Regarding the name Beasto Blanco, Garric said he wanted to give the band an identity. He wanted to create a name that band members and fans alike can relate to.

“We don’t come from much, but with music we feel we can accomplish anything,” he said. “Beasto Blanco represents the beast inside of you.”

Chris Latham, the band’s guitarist, said the band provides a good environment for people wanting to escape from their daily problem.

“People can lose themselves at our shows,” he said.

While the group has toured in Europe, the Soldotna show, along with two Anchorage performances earlier in the week, will mark the start of their first American tour that will take them all over the west coast.

Latham said having shows in Alaska was an important way to give back to all the fans in the state that have supported the band. He said songs from Beasto Blanco’s debut album “Live Fast, Die Loud” have been played extensively on Alaska rock ‘n’ roll radio stations.

“Alaska received us with open arms,” Latham said.

Alaskans aren’t the only fans of the band. Actor Johnny Depp said the group’s album is “beastly and killer,” according to a testimonial on the website of the group’s label.

While the band plans on finishing and releasing their sophomore album after the tour ends, they are currently focused on rocking Alaska.

“Alaska never let’s us down,” Latham said.

Tickets are $20 in advance. Doors open at 9:00 p.m.

Reach Ian Foley at Ian.foley@peninsulaclarion.com

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