KPEA President David Brighton speaks to a group of educators, community members and district employees at Resurrect Art Coffee House on Friday, Feb. 15, 2019 in Seward, Alaska. (Photo by Kat Sorensen/Peninsula Clarion)

KPEA President David Brighton speaks to a group of educators, community members and district employees at Resurrect Art Coffee House on Friday, Feb. 15, 2019 in Seward, Alaska. (Photo by Kat Sorensen/Peninsula Clarion)

Voices of the Peninsula: An open letter to the communities of the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District

We stand ready and willing to settle our contract negotiations so we can focus on educating children.

  • Wednesday, September 4, 2019 10:30pm
  • Opinion

As the presidents of the Kenai Peninsula Education Association and the Kenai Peninsula Education Support Association, we are engaged citizens, proud members of our communities, and educators. First and foremost, we are parents of children who attend our public schools. We want the best for our children just like you want the best for yours. We would like to offer our sincere thanks for the overwhelming support we’ve received from parents and community members alike over the past two weeks.

Being engaged in our children’s education as parents is vital to their success. In our tight-knit communities we develop relationships with the teachers and support staff who help ensure a safe and welcoming learning environment year after year. We take comfort in the fact that our younger children will get to follow in the footsteps of their older siblings and learn from the same teachers, sharing their experiences, and receiving a great education. This is possible because the Kenai Peninsula is a wonderful place to live and raise a family.

Our goal over the last 560 days has been to ensure that this remains true for the educators working in the KPBSD. Since we began bargaining with the district for a new contract there has been a single goal and focus — make health care affordable so that our communities stop losing excellent teachers and support staff because they can’t afford to work here. It’s really that simple.

Every action we take is rooted in a commitment to provide the best possible education to every student in the district. Ensuring all students have access to a great education starts with our ability to make competitive offers to high-quality educators who want to join and remain in our communities. As educators we want this because we succeed when we are surrounded by other excellent educators. As community members we want this because we know strong public schools attract business and other professionals. And as parents we want this because our children deserve the same opportunities as any other child in Alaska.

Thank you for your ongoing support. We stand ready and willing to settle our ongoing contract negotiations so we can focus entirely on our mission of educating your children. If you’d like to get engaged as a parent or a community member please check out the KPBS Parents for Quality Education Facebook group.

David Brighton is the president of the Kenai Peninsula Education Association. Anne McCabe is the president of the Kenai Peninsula Education Support Association.


• David Brighton is the president of the Kenai Peninsula Education Association. Anne McCabe is the president of the Kenai Peninsula Education Support Association.


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