Organic clay-based paint stands stacked in the window at the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, on Friday, May 4, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

Organic clay-based paint stands stacked in the window at the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, on Friday, May 4, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

Art from salvage

The group of old buildings behind the decorative mushrooms and tall spruce alongside the Sterling Highway are all rescued and finding new life with art.

Newest among them is the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, on Friday, May 4, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

Reach Elizabeth Earl at eearl@peninsulaclarion.com.

Art supplies wait on a table before a class at the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, on Friday, May 4, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

Art supplies wait on a table before a class at the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, on Friday, May 4, 2018 in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

This Friday, May 4, 2018 photo shows the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

This Friday, May 4, 2018 photo shows the “Art Shack,” an art studio space owned by Sue Mann, in Soldotna, Alaska. Mann, who owns the art supply store Artzy Junkin on the lot next to the Maverick Bar, opened the space as a joint studio space for artists to teach classes or make art. It’s been a longtime goal she is starting this year, with classes like a mother and daughter chandelier-making class, mosaic, tie-dye and stained glass. She currently has five artists working on contract, she said. “Really, that’s my heart for this — bringing artists together,” she said.

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