Trail Lakes Hatchery Manager Kristin Bates holds two bottles of preserved salmon fry at Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association’s Trail Lakes Hatchery on Friday, April 20, 2018 near Moose Pass, Alaska. Pacific salmon raised in hatcheries are usually exposed to predetermined sets of hot and cold water cycles before they hatch, leading to dark and light rings on their inner ear bone, called an otolith, that biologists can later read to track where the salmon came from when it returns as an adult. Staff at Trail Lakes Hatchery collect some of the imprinted fry and bottle them to be sent to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game as a sample of how otoliths from that brood year were marked, allowing the biologists to later determine where an adult salmon came from. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

Trail Lakes Hatchery Manager Kristin Bates holds two bottles of preserved salmon fry at Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association’s Trail Lakes Hatchery on Friday, April 20, 2018 near Moose Pass, Alaska. Pacific salmon raised in hatcheries are usually exposed to predetermined sets of hot and cold water cycles before they hatch, leading to dark and light rings on their inner ear bone, called an otolith, that biologists can later read to track where the salmon came from when it returns as an adult. Staff at Trail Lakes Hatchery collect some of the imprinted fry and bottle them to be sent to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game as a sample of how otoliths from that brood year were marked, allowing the biologists to later determine where an adult salmon came from. (Photo by Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion)

A look into how salmon hatcheries mark their fish

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