Ed Haun entertains tourists w saw—In this 1972 photo, 87-year-old Ed Haun entertains tourists on his porch with musical abilities on a handsaw. (Courtesy of the Hope and Sunrise Historical Society)

How ‘Red Hat’ fits in

How the life of a man long since dead has jarred loose and clarified a nearly 50-year-old memory.

Ed Haun entertains tourists w saw—In this 1972 photo, 87-year-old Ed Haun entertains tourists on his porch with musical abilities on a handsaw. (Courtesy of the Hope and Sunrise Historical Society)
Cooper Landing characters (from left): “Little Jim” Dunmire, Harold and Gary Davis, Beverly and Joe Sabrowski, and “Big Jim” O’Brien, circa 1940s. (Photo provided by Mona Painter)

From nomadic life to stability

The journey of Beverly Christensen — Part Two

Cooper Landing characters (from left): “Little Jim” Dunmire, Harold and Gary Davis, Beverly and Joe Sabrowski, and “Big Jim” O’Brien, circa 1940s. (Photo provided by Mona Painter)
Beverly Christensen speaks at a historical society meeting, circa 1980s. (Photo provided by Mona Painter)

From Nomadic Life to Stability: The Journey of Beverly Christensen—Part One

Christensen spent most of her final decades in long, peaceful stints in Cohoe and Clam Gulch.

Beverly Christensen speaks at a historical society meeting, circa 1980s. (Photo provided by Mona Painter)
This enlarged section of Dr. David H. Sleem’s 1910 map of the Kenai Mining District shows the Shackleford Cabin just above the Kenai River outlet on lower Kenai Lake. The stream entering the lake at the far right is Quartz Creek.

A tale of two Shacklefords, in a way — part two

New facts intruded upon my easy solution to the origins of the eponymously named creek and cabin.

This enlarged section of Dr. David H. Sleem’s 1910 map of the Kenai Mining District shows the Shackleford Cabin just above the Kenai River outlet on lower Kenai Lake. The stream entering the lake at the far right is Quartz Creek.
This portrait—one of few that Richard Shackelford reportedly allowed to be published—graced the 1909 commencement booklet for the California Polytechnic School, of which he was the president of the Board of Trustees. (Photo courtesy Clark Fair)

A tale of Two Shacklefords, in a way — part three

Untangling the origins of Shackleford Creek’s name.

This portrait—one of few that Richard Shackelford reportedly allowed to be published—graced the 1909 commencement booklet for the California Polytechnic School, of which he was the president of the Board of Trustees. (Photo courtesy Clark Fair)
Photo by Clark Fair
Fred Shackleford’s grave (second from right) in the Point Comfort Cemetery near Hope is featured in this undated photo.

A tale of two Shacklefords, in a way — part one

The mystery of Shackleford Creek had me baffled for quite some time.

Photo by Clark Fair
Fred Shackleford’s grave (second from right) in the Point Comfort Cemetery near Hope is featured in this undated photo.
Laden with a game bag full of black bear meat, Dan France heads for camp near the Tustumena Glacier, 1963. Zebra Mountain and the glacier can be seen in the background. (Photo courtesy Fair Family Photo Collection)

A Sheepish Tale

In August 1963, my long-time neighbor and my father flew into the Tustumena benchlands.

Laden with a game bag full of black bear meat, Dan France heads for camp near the Tustumena Glacier, 1963. Zebra Mountain and the glacier can be seen in the background. (Photo courtesy Fair Family Photo Collection)
Photo courtesy of the Pratt Museum
Walter R. Bell poses for a photo in Seldovia in 1918.

For most in Homer, Walter didn’t ring any bells

The marker read: “Walter R. Bell. Buried here July 1921. Born in 1860, Fillmore Co., Minn.”

Photo courtesy of the Pratt Museum
Walter R. Bell poses for a photo in Seldovia in 1918.
A ptarmigan hunter takes in the sunshine near the front door of the Jims’ cabin on upper Surprise Creek, summer 1968. (Photo from the Fair Family Collection)

The two Jims, Part 3: More fun in the finding than in the having

“This is not a gold country, and don’t let anybody kid you.”

A ptarmigan hunter takes in the sunshine near the front door of the Jims’ cabin on upper Surprise Creek, summer 1968. (Photo from the Fair Family Collection)
Big Jim (left) and Little Jim show off some of the furs from a recent winter’s trapping season, circa late 1950s. (Photo courtesy of Mona Painter)

The two Jims, part two: Coming home and battling a bully

In their early days in the Cooper Landing area, the Jims needed a place to live.

Big Jim (left) and Little Jim show off some of the furs from a recent winter’s trapping season, circa late 1950s. (Photo courtesy of Mona Painter)
James “Little Jim” Dunmire (left) and James “Big Jim” O’Brien. (Photo courtesy of Mona Painter)

History Lessons: Coming in for the Landing: An Origin Story

Jim’s Landing honors two close friends: James (“Big Jim”) O’Brien and James (“Little Jim”) Dunmire.

James “Little Jim” Dunmire (left) and James “Big Jim” O’Brien. (Photo courtesy of Mona Painter)
Drew at King Country Creek cabin remains are pictured in 1999. All that remains of the last King County Creek cabin, just inland from Skilak Lake, are these well-weathered logs, which are difficult to find in the tall grass at that location. (Photo by Clark Fair)

An unusual and difficult journey to the Kenai (part 2)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second part of a two-part story about the Kings County Mining Company’s expedition to the Kenai Peninsula in 1898. Part… Continue reading

Drew at King Country Creek cabin remains are pictured in 1999. All that remains of the last King County Creek cabin, just inland from Skilak Lake, are these well-weathered logs, which are difficult to find in the tall grass at that location. (Photo by Clark Fair)
Pictured is Henry W. Rozell, one of the principal founders of the Kings County Mining Company. Rozell, shown here eight years after the expedition to the Kenai Peninsula, was the group’s treasurer. (Photo from ancestry.com)

History Lesson: An unusual and difficult journey to the Kenai

New history column kicks off with the story of Kings County Mining Company’s expedition to peninsula.

Pictured is Henry W. Rozell, one of the principal founders of the Kings County Mining Company. Rozell, shown here eight years after the expedition to the Kenai Peninsula, was the group’s treasurer. (Photo from ancestry.com)
Brie and caramel apple voulevant is sure to be a crowd-pleaser, photographed in April, 2021, in Nikiski, Alaska. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)

On the strawberry patch: A celebration of food

Make first gatherings special with this simple but sophisticated brie and caramel apple voulevant.

Brie and caramel apple voulevant is sure to be a crowd-pleaser, photographed in April, 2021, in Nikiski, Alaska. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
A souffle omelet takes a delicate hand but offers rich flavors and sophisticated textures. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)

On the strawberry patch: A Mother’s Day omelet from the heart

Mother’s Day has been one of the hardest days of every year since my mother left this world 13 years ago.

A souffle omelet takes a delicate hand but offers rich flavors and sophisticated textures. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
A Greek and Moroccan-inspired grain bowl made with elements of my favorite foods and flavors, photgraphed on Feb. 3, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Grain bowl goodness

I’m thinking about food as an expression of myself and an opportunity to experiment in the kitchen.

A Greek and Moroccan-inspired grain bowl made with elements of my favorite foods and flavors, photgraphed on Feb. 3, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Getting my ingredients ready for blueberry crumble, where the berries can be prepared right in the pan and the topping in a small bowl, on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Something nice

It feels like the right time to make some of my grandma’s blueberry crumble.

Getting my ingredients ready for blueberry crumble, where the berries can be prepared right in the pan and the topping in a small bowl, on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
A typical pesto pasta night at our house, Dec. 26, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalfironsky Kitchen: A fresh start with pesto

It’s bright. It’s green. It’s fresh. It’s cheesy. What’s not to love?

A typical pesto pasta night at our house, Dec. 26, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kladdkaka sprinkled with powdered sugar is ready to be eaten, photographed on Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Can-do Kladdkaka

In Sweden, this cake is usually eaten for fika, which is a coffee and cake break.

Kladdkaka sprinkled with powdered sugar is ready to be eaten, photographed on Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Hot and sour soup closes out a dark and cold winter, photographed on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)

Kalifornsky Kitchen: Hot and sour soup to close out winter

As the sun stays up longer, and the ice in our yard melts away, I’m also assessing our pantry.

Hot and sour soup closes out a dark and cold winter, photographed on Tuesday, April 20, 2021, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)